Tingewick Historical Society – Great War Project – update

To commemorate the centenary of the start of The Great War members of Tingewick Historical Society have been researching Tingewick’s WW1 soldiers who are named on our village war memorials. We have now published a book telling the stories of the twenty two soldiers and copies can be obtained from Ruth Roy ruthroy@hotmail.com  or Lorraine Carter lorraine.carter@btinternet.com  price £3 50 plus £1 postage in the UK (please contact Ruth or Lorraine for p&p cost if overseas).

Over one hundred and forty Tingewick men fought in The Great War and we will be researching their stories over the next few years.  We would be pleased to hear from any descendants of those men – if you have any information or photographs please contact Ruth or Lorraine.

OCTOGENARIAN’S FOURTH WIFE (1925)

Octogenarian's Fourth Wife (1925)

NEWS IN BRIEF. (1925, July 28). The Cessnock Eagle and South Maitland Recorder (NSW : 1913 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved November 5, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99363824

Spotted by Sue D in Australia:

“NEWS IN BRIEF

OCTOGENARIAN’S FOURTH WIFE

Mr. Joseph Burrows aged 82, and Mrs. Jemima Cooper, aged 66, both of Tingewick (Bucks), were married at the register office, Buckingham. This is Mr. Burrows’ fourth marriage. He is of independent means.”

Cessnock Eagle and South Maitland Recorder, Tuesday 28 July 1925, p 5. —-  a newspaper from rural Cessnock and Maitland, New South Wales, Australia [near Newcastle, NSW) (coal mining and agricultural areas”

================================================

Joseph Burrows was the son of John Burrows of Buckingham and Hannah Smith who had married at Tingewick in April 1839 – he was the second of their five children, four of whom were boys.  Until his first marriage (probably just after the 1871 census), he lived with his parents and siblings in Buckingham; ten years later he was a general labourer in Tower Hamlets, London, with his first wife and two children.  In 1891 he was a widower, still in Tower Hamlets but soon afterwards he married again and by 1901 he had another son under ten years old.  That wife retired with him to Tingewick before the 1911 census (where he describes himself as a “retired dock labourer”; presumably she died, he married, and was widowed a third time before his marriage to Mrs Cooper in 1925.

Jemima and her first husband – Abel Cooper – were both born in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire.  The first of their five children was born in Cornwall, the next back in Chipping Norton, the third in London.  Around 1896, they moved to Tingewick, where Abel worked as a labourer before becoming a beer retailer in Cross Lane from around 1907 to 1915.

Joseph Burrows died in the third quarter of 1830.

The loss of the Northfleet, 1873

Fetch-2473I wrote most of this piece six months ago but got side-tracked (as usual!) before I’d finished tying up loose ends.  Then, quite by chance, two things happened within a week: I had an email from a descendant of Caroline Holton; and I came across a newspaper cutting (The Bucks Herald of 1st March 1873), reporting on the inquest into another of the people who drowned.

 

[The account of the wreck comes from the Maritime Moments website, to whom I am greatly indebted.]

Some years ago I contributed notes and annotations to a book entitled “From Tingewick to Tioga“.  It was based on an account of the Holton family, written in 1917 by Joseph T. Holton whose father had emigrated from Tingewick to Pennsylvania in 1851.  One of his notes said:

“My aunt, Caroline Holton was born 1826 and she married John _________ and they had children born unto them and they was drownded in the North Sea in 1873 and one child was safe in a boat and was adopted by people near Dover, but they say it died.  But they say that they left two girls and they married two brothers named Day and that they went to London, but they have not heard.”

Caroline had, in fact, married John Taplin in October 1848 at Tingewick.  He was probably working on the railway line, which was built across the northern edge of the parish around 1847. They had six daughters in the next twelve years.  The second was baptised in Tingewick but died in infancy: the two youngest were twins, born in 1862.

The family was constantly on the move: Welling in Hertfordshire in 1849; Whatlington in Sussex in 1851; Dudley, Worcestershire in 1854; Tiveydale in Staffordshire in 1859; Bakewell in Derbyshire in 1861; Rosebury in Derbyshire in 1862; and  Finsbury in London in 1871.  By 1873, perhaps the boom in railway work in England had ended.  John signed up to work on the Tasmanian Railroad, and – with his wife and three youngest daughters – boarded the Northfleet in London.  On board were 379 people (including the crew and the pilot), 340 tons of iron rails, and 240 tons of other equipment, bound for Hobart in Tasmania.  At 11 am on January 13 1873, she slipped down the river from London.

The late January weather was stormy and more than a week later they had only reached Dungeness, where they spent the night of the 22nd at anchor, in company with perhaps 300 other boats waiting for the weather to lift.  Sometime after midnight, disaster struck – a steamer ran into them, striking them hard on the starboard side.  Without identifying herself, the steamer backed away and vanished into the night.

For whatever reason, only two of the seven lifeboats were launched.  Perhaps there wasn’t time (from the inquest I just found, ‘the lashings were too tight’) - within 30 minutes, the boat had sunk.  In spite of the captain’s best efforts (including, apparently, shooting a man in the knee who disobeyed his orders), only two women, one child and one baby were saved.  The rest of the 86 survivors were all men, including 11 of the crew.  So much for women and children first!  In all, 293 lives were lost: 41 were women; 43 were children; and 7 were babies under 1 year old.

The one child that was saved was Maria Taplin.  It seems they were soon picked up by a steam tug, the City of London, and taken to the Seaman’s Mission in Dover.  The captain’s wife – now widowed – offered to take Maria to London: the newspapers printed her story, and offers to adopt her poured in.  Some versions say she went to live with her older sisters, now married: but the death registered in Dover in the third quarter of 1879 of a 17-year old Maria Taplin is probably hers.

“NEXT OF KIN WANTED and others to their advantage” – 1910

Advertising. (1910, November 15). Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 – 1947), p. 4. Retrieved September 30, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148951166

screen-capture

Bradbury, Henrietta, who lived atTingewick, Bucks, about 30 years ago,  wanted to her advantage. L.L. 4639

 

Henrietta’s father, Richard Bradbury, was a grocer in Islington on the 1881 census: he was the son of Thomas Bradbury, for ten years or so around 1838-1849 the landlord of the White Hart public house in Tingewick.  Richard and his six siblings were all baptised in Tingewick but Henrietta was born in Islington, and I’m not aware that she ever lived in Tingewick.

UNDER AN EXPRESS, July 1907

UNDER AN EXPRESS. (1907, July 20). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved September 6, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88139638

 

screen-capture-16UNDER AN EXPRESS.
Willie Shepherd is evidently not fated to
be killed on the railway, for after falling
out of a train and being knocked down by
an express he is running about as though
such things were among the commonplaces
of everyday life (says ‘Lloyd’s News’).
Willie, who is only 5 years old, was tra-
velling with his father, William Shepherd,
to Tingewick, near Buckingham. The boy
was looking out of tbe window of the car-
riage shortly after the train left Twyford,
when the door flew open and he fell out.
The communication cord was pulled, and
the train brought to a standstill. The father
at once got out, and saw his son walking
between tbe metals on which an express
was approaching at a high speed. The
boy was dashed to the ground by the ex-
press before his father could reach him, but
when the express passed he rose to his feet
and ran towards his father with his head
and face covered with blood. He was con-
veyed by train to Maidenhead, and after
being medically treated was taken on to
Buckingham, where he was further at-
tended to. Except for abrasions on the
face and nose the little chap is apparently
none the worse for his adventure. ‘I re-
member falling out of the train,’ he says.
‘It did not hurt me. I was not frightened,
because I am a brave boy. When I saw
the train going away from me I got up and
ran for the train. It did not stop,
though.’


screen-capture-17
A doctor declares that so long as a cyclist,
after a long ride, has a good appetite, does
not feel a desire to go to sleep at once,
and is not annoyed by heavy dreams when
he goes to bed, he may consider that he
has not made too great a demand on his
physical resources.

ENGLISH LADY’S LETTER, August 1949

ENGLISH LADY’S LETTER. (1949, August 26). The Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal (NSW : 1888 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved September 6, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119269216
screen-capture-14

ENGLISH LADY’S LETTER
CONDEMNS ENGLAND’S
SOCIALIST GOVERNMENT
Writing to a friend in Braidwood,
Lady Eva Keyes, of ‘Tingewick House,”
Buckingham, England, who visited
this district nearly five years ago
sends thanks for a parcel sent her
recently by a local lady. She also ex-
pressed her opinion in pretty plain
terms of conditions in England under
what she terms the ‘spendthrift, so-
cialist and incompetent Labour Gov-
ernment.’ The letter reads: —
‘How awfully kind of you to send
me a parcel. I appreciate your kind
remembrance and thought for me
very much, and send you warmest
thanks. The parcel will be most use-
ful, as of course you know our meat
ration is very small nowadays, worse
than during the war even, so a few
extra tins are a great help for when-
ever someone extra turns up unex-
pectedly especially.
‘People in Australia have been won-
derfully kind in sending parcels to
people here, and it has made a great
difference in helping the dull rations
out. Ten years of austerity and ra-
tions is too long, but I don’t suppose
it will get any better until we can get
this spendthrift Socialist and incom-
petent Government out and get back
to freedom and private enterprise
again, instead of being tied up in im-
possible rules and regulations with
thousands of unnecessary Government
officials to run them and waste our
money. They have lost millions over
the potatoes alone this year, as I know
from my own experience here. I am
market gardening, and was asked by
the Agricultural Committee to grow
an acre of potatoes. I had a very
good crop of over 10 tons, but was not
allowed to sell them to the local fish
and chip shop, who wanted them in
February: instead, the Government
bought them, but left them in the
slumps until end of June, by which
time they were nearly all bad, and,
having paid me £92, they only got £8
for the remainder as pig food, and
my lovely potatoes and all the work we
had growing them was wasted. This
happened all over the country, as they
had bought thousands of tons from
abroad, which were not wanted at all.
‘This is typical of their bulk buying,
instead of leaving it to the people who
understand it and the ordinary mar-
ket supply and demand. I have done
fairly well with garden produce and
poultry, and the hard work keeps me
occupied at any rate.
‘I look back to our wonderful trip
to Australia and the many kind peo-
ple we met there and often wish I
was back there again, but don’t sup-
pose I shall ever do anything half as
interesting again.’

British Army Records 1914-1920

Some Tingewick men who appear in the British Army records 1914-1920

[last update: 1st Sept 2014]

Albert John Aris, ‘Canteen Steward’, born 1880, son of John and Maria (Greaves): Royal Garrison Artillery: signed up 13 Oct 1914: discharged (having been promoted several times, finally to rank of Sgt) 26 June 1919.  He must have been an impressive sight – relatively tall at 5 ft 10½ and weighing 182 lbs when he enlisted, he had a 42 in chest and a number of tattoos – “flags on inside of left arm, & figure of General Butler on forearm & faith home & charity, also figures on right arm, Lord Kitchener &c”.  He appears to have joined the army for 6 years in 1898, which he extended for a further 6 years in August 1905 while serving as a gunner in Gibraltar.  He also served in Sierra Leone, South Africa and Malta, finally discharged from the regular army in 1913, after nearly 16 years’ service, during which he had been promoted to Bombardier but had reverted to Gunner at his own request!

Thomas George Barnes, labourer, born 1880, son of  Joseph and Mary Ann: enlisted 10 Nov 1914 but two weeks later: “Discharged – not being likely to become an efficient soldier under para 392(111)(c) Kings Regulations” – signed by the colonel commanding the 8th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry.  He appeared before a medical board but there is no record of any physical disability.

William Ambrose Cross Neale, shoemaker, born 1879, son of Elizabeth Neale enlisted 30th June 1915 in the Army Services Corps. His army record shows his ‘physical development’ was ‘poor’ and he wore glasses.  He sailed to France aboard SS ‘Lydia‘ in July 1915 and joined 16 Labour Coy at Rouen: he was absent from roll call in November and lost 3 days’ pay.  He was invalided to England (T.S. ‘Panama‘) on 12 March 1916 and admitted to Manchester Western Hospital suffering from ‘Debility‘ caused by diarrhoea and vomiting, and with sleep problems.  Six weeks later he was discharged from hospital with his weight regained and sleep improved but on 21st June 1916 he received a “Discharge being no longer physically fit for work” and was awarded a pension of 4/8d per week.  His medical notes also show that he had a slight heart murmur.

George Alfred Richardson, clerk, born 1890, son of James and Louisa was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.  His citation reads:

“265046 CSM G.A. Richardson MM 1/1st Bn. TF (Tingewick) (ITALY)
“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion
to duty during the attack north of
Asiago on 1st November 1918, when in
face of heavy machine-gun, rifle and
shell fire he did magnificent work in
reorganising the men on the various
objectives and leading them forward.
By his cheerfulness and coolness he set
a very fine example to all about him.
(25.2.20)”

Reginald George Benjamin Steeden, farmer, born 1884, son of James and Jane (nee Paxton) enlisted at Bletchley Recruiting Office on 14 December 1915 and was appointed to the 96th Territorial Reserve Battalion – perhaps because of his occupation.  However, he appears to have seen at least one spell in the British Expeditionary Force at the end of September 1917.

James Arthur Stuchfield, railway porter born 1891, son of George and Elizabeth (Lucas) joined the Grenadier Guards 31st August 1908 and was discharged into the Reserves after three years service.  He was mobilised as part of the Expeditionary Forces on 5th August 1914 – the day after war was declared.  He was wounded in the leg in September 1916 and returned to the UK where he remained until he was again transferred to the reserves in June 1918.

Abel Townsend, platelayer with the L & N W railway, was a relative newcomer to the village.  He was born in Mixbury but his family had moved to Finmere before the 1891 census, and he had presumably set up home in Tingewick when he married.  His daughter Beatrice had been baptised at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in October 1906.  He was attested in December 1915 but was medically classified “B1″ and kept ‘on reserve’ until March 1917, when he was finally posted to Egypt with the Railway Company, Royal Engineers, as a platelayer / sapper.  He was transferred out in April 1919 with “Lumbago & Sciatica, following Dysentery (attributed)” – 40% disablement and awarded a pension – initially – of 11/- per week.  He appears to have contracted Amoebic Dysentery in Palestine in October 1918, when he was admitted to hospital with diarrhoea and vomiting.

The items in his possession on admission to hospital in Cairo were inventoried as: 1 pair drawers, 1 pair gaiters, 1 pair putties, 2 flannel shire, 3 pairs socks, 1 towel, 1 pair trousers, a fork, a holdall, a clasp knife and a table knife and a spoon, a haversack, boots with laces, braces, shaving and tooth brush, cap with badge, hair comb, tropical helmet, and razor in a case.  His medical notes are also quite comprehensive – perhaps a little too graphic, considering his ailment, but fascinating as a window into that aspect of life in the Great War.  They even include his temperature chart!

================

ALSO:

William Ball, born 1881, enlisted in the Northamptonshire Regiment in 1903 and served in South Africa.  In 1906 he married Martha Jane Stuchbury at Hillesden: she lived in Tingewick, and her daughters (Celia May and Ethel) were born there in 1903 and 1908.  William served in France in 1914 and 1915: he was severely wounded / gassed on 25th September 1915 and was discharged 30 March 1916.

Deaths of Henry William Judd 1891-1926 and Mrs N. B. Judd d. 1936

[spotted by Sue Dudley]

OBITUARY. (1924, March 24). The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), p. 6.
Retrieved August 17, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23724633

screen-capture-9OBITUARY.
MR. H. W. JUDD
It is with very great regret that we
announce the death, which occurred with
unexpected suddenness last evening, of
Mr. Henry William Judd, an esteemed
member of “The Mercury” literary staff.
He was a highly capable journalist, and,
by reason of his genial disposition, had
endeared himself to a wide circle of
friends in every part of the State.
Coming to Tasmania from England ,
thirty odd years ago, deceased began his
career in Hobart as a reporter on the
“Tasmanian News,” on which paper his
ability and never-failing courtesy earned
for him marked popularity with all with
whom he came in contact. Later he
transferred to the Hobart staff of “The
Mercury,” where, during his whole
period of sevice, he was held in the
highest esteem by both the management
and his fellow colleagues. After being
located in the head office tor some years
he was appointed manager of the Zee-
han branch of “The Mercury” office, and
later still manager of the branch at
Launceston., At both centres he took a
keen interest in mining, and was recog-
nised as an authority on the subject. A
little over two years ago Mr. Judd re-
turned to Habart, and made his home at
Douglas-street, New Town, where his
demise took place in such tragic circum- |
stances last evening. Speaking to a mem-
bers of the staff yesterday afternoon
concerning his trip to Beaconsfield,
from which place he hud returned only
the previous evening, after representing
“The Mercury” at the annual show, de-
ceased appeared to be in the best of
health. When at home later in the even-
ing, however, it would appear that he
was seized with a fit of coughing, dur-
ing which he expired.
Deceased, who was fifty-nine years of
age, leaves a widow and two daughters,
one of whom is married, and one son,
Mr. J. Judd.

Deceased, in addition to being a most
capable journalist, showed ability as a
photographer, his Illustrated .’Guide to
the West Coast,” which he first publish-
ed several years ago, being a production
of outstanding merit. In his youth he
played cricket with the old Wellington
Club, and met with a good deal of sic-
sess, particularly as a bowler. His main
hobby was gardening.

 

Funeral of Hr H.W. Judd

THE LATE MR. H. W. JUDD.
THE FUNERAL.
The funeral of the late Mr H W. Judd,
of “The Mercury” Literary Staff, took
place yesterday afternoon, the remains
being interred at Cornelian Bay ceme-
tery There was a large and represen-
tative gathering, old comrades of the
deceased from all parts of the State at-
tending to pay their last tribute.
Amongst those gathered at the grave-
side were Messrs E A Counsel,, ISO
(representing the Minister for Lands),
\V A Pretyman (Secretary for Mines,
representing the Minister for Mines),
J K Reid (Clerk of the House of As-
sembly, who represented the Speaker,
Hon. J. W. Evans, C M G ), C D Chep-
mell (Clerk of the Legislativo Council),
G Crosby Gilmore (Police Magistrate),
D O’Keefe M.H.R., Selby Wilson, Luke
Williams, J Earle, Hon E Mulcahy, and
Colonel R Eccles Snowden, M. H. A. All
departments of “The Mercury” were
represented, those present including
Messrs C. R. Davies (chairman of direc-
tors) C. B. Davies (a director), W.H.
Cummins (General Manager), W H Sim-
monds (Editor), and L Broinowski (As-
sociate Editor). The “World” staff, of
which Mr J. Judd, deceased’s son, is a
member, was also strongly represented,
the editor (Mr. J. M. Mackay) being in-
cluded in their number. Mr G. Hogarth
( Daily Telegraph,” Launceston), and Mr
S. Blackburn (‘ Examiner,” Launceston),
also represented the Launceston
sub-branch of the Australian Journalists’
Association The Tasmanian district of
[photo] THE LATE MR. H. W. JUDD.
the A.J.A. of which the late Mr Judd
had recently been president and on
the executive of which he represented
Ihe Launceston sub-branch at the time
of his death, was represented
by the president (Mr J Chap-
man), secretary (Mr A. O’Brien),
and members of the committee. The
pall bearers were Messrs C. R. Davies,
W HI Cummins, J M Mackay, and M
O’Brien The chief mourners comprised
Messrs J Judd (son), E Judd (brother),
and T R Lee (son in law) Numerous
beautiful floral tributes were placed on
the grave, including tokens fiom the
following. -Proprietors of ‘The Mer-
cury ‘ and ‘ Illustrated Tasmanian Mail,”
General Manager of “The Mercury” and
“Illustrated Tasmanian Mail” (Mr W
H Cummins), and Mrs Cummins, “The
Mercury” Literary Staff, Premier and
State Ministers, Hobart Regatta Associa-
tion, Tasmanian District AJA, “Exami
ner” Literary Staff, editor of ‘The Mer-
cury,” editor of the “Illustrated Tas-
manian Mail,” ind Launceston sub-dis
tact AJA. The services at the house
and graveside were conducted by the
Rev J H Wills (Anglican), who at the
graveside paid a tribute to the deceased’s
many fine qualities. Mr Judd had, he
said, led a life that was upright and hon-
ourable and his work had been heartily
and thoroughly performed He had done
his duty in a manner which all should
try to emulate He had been honoured
and esteemed The funeral arrange-
ments were carried out by Messrs Clark
Bros


 

LATE MR. H. W. JUDD. (1924, March 25). The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), p. 6.

Retrieved August 23, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23724908

The Premier's Tribute

LATE MR. H. W. JUDD.
THE PREMIER’S TRIBUTE.
The Premier (Hon J A Lyons) stated
yesterday that it was his desire on be-
half of the Government and himself
to give expression to their sympathy
with the relatives of the late Mr H.
W. Judd of “The Mercury” staff whose
painfully sudden death occurred on Sun-
day night He said that, with other
Ministers he had had ample oppor-
tunity of seeing the late Mr Judd’s
work from time to time and of coming
into close touch with bim official!y
They had always received the greatest
courtesy from him. His duties had
always been carried out in a gentlemanly
and capable manner He wanted
particularly to say that neither Minis-
ters nor members had had cause to com-
plain that any of Mr Judd’s reports of
speeches in the House of elsewhere had
ever been inaccurate 0r unfair. General-
ly, they regretted his loss very much
Mr D D Griffin writes -As ne
who had the privilege and pleasure -
and it was a pleasure-of intimate ac-
quaintance with the genial Mr. Judd, I
was grieved to hear of his sudden de-
mise, so entirely unexpected by his
numerous friends in the North-West and
on the West Coast as well as elsewhere
Apart from his marked ability as a
journalist, he had a most affable, always
the same disposition. Few men took
more interest in mining or were better
versed in its prospects than Mr Judd.
Only recently I had a chat with him
anent prospects of a genuine mining re-
vival and the prospect there was of
opening up what we both hoped may
prove i great mining field in this State.
And now, alas, he has suddenly gone
out into the unknown across the Great
Divide. ____________

 

OBITUARY MRS. N. B. JUDD. (1936, June 8). The Mercury(Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), p. 6.
Retrieved August 17, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article25207766

 

OBITUARYscreen-capture-8

MRS. N. B. JUDD 

Journalistic Associations

Funeral at Cornelian Bay
Mrs. Nona Belairs Judd, wife to the
late Mr: Henry William Judd, and
mother of the late Mr. Jack Judd, died
at her home, Tingewick, Douglas Street,
New Town, on Friday. Mr. H. W. Judd
and Mr. J. Judd, were well-known Tas
manian journalists, and each, at the
time of his death, was a member of the
literary staff of “The Mercury.” Mr. H.
W. Judd was at one time manager of
the Northern office of “The Mercury.”
The late Mrs. Judd is survived by two
daughters, Mrs..T. R. Lee, of Ivanhoe,
Victoria, and Mrs. H. C. Tanner, of
Ranelaghlagh, Tasmania.
The funeral took place yesterday at
Cornelian Bay cemetery, and the chief
mourners were Messrs. J. Tibballs
(brother), T. Lee and H. C. Tanner
(sons-in-law), C A. Bennetto, A. Ben-
netto and H. Bennetto (nephews).
Among those at the graveside, where
a service was conducted by Canon C.
W. Wilson, were the Lord Mayor (Mr.
J. J . Wignall), Aldermen W. J. Rennie
and W. W. Osborne, the managing
editor of “The Mercury” (Mr. F..Usher),
the chief of staff of “The Mercury”
Mr. C. G. Patman) and the deputy
chief of staff’ (Mr. A. G. Bradley), the
president of’ the Australian Journal-
ists’ Association, Tasmania district (Mr.
R. W. Brooks), Col. R. A. Rafferty,
Messrs. W. L. Grace and J. Lonergan,
Clark Bros. were the funeral direc-
tors.

Tingewick Male Fashion in 1754

Spotted by Sue in Australia in the Oxford Journal in February 1754

“Whereas Edward Jakeman and Thomas Day, both of
the Parish of Tingewick in the County of Bucks,
on the fifteenth Day of December last past, made their
Escape from the Constable and others, as they were con-
ducting them to Aylesbury Gaol for a Burglary.  Who-
ever shall apprehend the said Jakeman and Day, and send
Notice thereof to Mr. John Peake of Tingewick aforesaid,
shall receive Ten Guineas and reasonable Charges or five
Guineas for either of them by me

JOHN PEAKE.

Jakeman is a lusty Man, dark brown curled Hair, has a
large hooked Nose, fresh Colour, about forty Years of
Age; had on when he escaped, a coarse Sacking Frock,
a white Flannel Waistcoat, and Sacking Breeches.  Day is
a sprightly Man, of a fair Complexion, about five Feet
eight Inches high, light-coloured Hair, has but the Sight
of one Eye, the other having a large Speck over it, about
thirty Years of Age; had on when he escaped, a brown
Drab-coloured Coat, and Boots, but has been since seen
near Buckingham in a Light Grey Frock, Scarlet Waist-
coat, and Boots.”

Alas, I can’t add much more to the tale: Edward Jakeman would have been born around 1715.  Was he the brother of Hemmins Jakeman, son of John (born 1721 in Stratton Audley) who came to Tingewick in March 1740 as an apprentice cordwainer (a type of shoemaker), marrying local girl Elizabeth Reeves nearly three years later  and baptising two sons in Tingewick?  According to a family tree on Ancestry, Hemmings John Jakeman did have a brother Edward, born 1715, who married Bridget Hearn in Stratton Audley in 1745 and died in Preston Bissett in 1782 … so it seems he wasn’t one of the unfortunates who was transported to the colonies for his crimes.

There was also a Mary Day of Tingewick who married Mordecai Burnham at Stowe in 1751: a sister perhaps of the absconding felon?

John Peake, on the other hand, was a man of property and substance: at his marriage to Anne Perkins in 1745 at Finmere, he is given the honorary title of “Mister” and she of “Mistress”: and he was allocated several portions of land in the Tingewick Inclosure of 1774.  Presumably it was his house which had been burgled by Jakeman and Day?

Tingewick World War I project

To commemorate the centenary of the start of WW1 members of Tingewick Historical Society  are researching Tingewick’s WW1 soldiers who are named on our village war memorials.   We would love to hear from people descended from those families who have photographs or stories to share with us.  Over one hundred Tingewick men fought in World War One and, while we are currently researching those that died, we would also be pleased to hear from descendants of any of the men who survived.  If you have any information please contact Ruth Roy ruthroy@hotmail.com  or Lorraine Carter   lorraine.carter@btinternet.com (and, perhaps, add details here as a comment)