Tingewick Male Fashion in 1754

Spotted by Sue in Australia in the Oxford Journal in February 1754

“Whereas Edward Jakeman and Thomas Day, both of
the Parish of Tingewick in the County of Bucks,
on the fifteenth Day of December last past, made their
Escape from the Constable and others, as they were con-
ducting them to Aylesbury Gaol for a Burglary.  Who-
ever shall apprehend the said Jakeman and Day, and send
Notice thereof to Mr. John Peake of Tingewick aforesaid,
shall receive Ten Guineas and reasonable Charges or five
Guineas for either of them by me

JOHN PEAKE.

Jakeman is a lusty Man, dark brown curled Hair, has a
large hooked Nose, fresh Colour, about forty Years of
Age; had on when he escaped, a coarse Sacking Frock,
a white Flannel Waistcoat, and Sacking Breeches.  Day is
a sprightly Man, of a fair Complexion, about five Feet
eight Inches high, light-coloured Hair, has but the Sight
of one Eye, the other having a large Speck over it, about
thirty Years of Age; had on when he escaped, a brown
Drab-coloured Coat, and Boots, but has been since seen
near Buckingham in a Light Grey Frock, Scarlet Waist-
coat, and Boots.”

Alas, I can’t add much more to the tale: Edward Jakeman would have been born around 1715.  Was he the brother of Hemmins Jakeman, son of John (born 1721 in Stratton Audley) who came to Tingewick in March 1740 as an apprentice cordwainer (a type of shoemaker), marrying local girl Elizabeth Reeves nearly three years later  and baptising two sons in Tingewick?  According to a family tree on Ancestry, Hemmings John Jakeman did have a brother Edward, born 1715, who married Bridget Hearn in Stratton Audley in 1745 and died in Preston Bissett in 1782 … so it seems he wasn’t one of the unfortunates who was transported to the colonies for his crimes.

There was also a Mary Day of Tingewick who married Mordecai Burnham at Stowe in 1751: a sister perhaps of the absconding felon?

John Peake, on the other hand, was a man of property and substance: at his marriage to Anne Perkins in 1745 at Finmere, he is given the honorary title of “Mister” and she of “Mistress”: and he was allocated several portions of land in the Tingewick Inclosure of 1774.  Presumably it was his house which had been burgled by Jakeman and Day?

Tingewick World War I project

To commemorate the centenary of the start of WW1 members of Tingewick Historical Society  are researching Tingewick’s WW1 soldiers who are named on our village war memorials.   We would love to hear from people descended from those families who have photographs or stories to share with us.  Over one hundred Tingewick men fought in World War One and, while we are currently researching those that died, we would also be pleased to hear from descendants of any of the men who survived.  If you have any information please contact Ruth Roy ruthroy@hotmail.com  or Lorraine Carter   lorraine.carter@btinternet.com (and, perhaps, add details here as a comment)

Crime and punishment – 1803-1830

From the Buckinghamshire Quarter Sessions, extracted from the National Archives website:

Michaelmas, 1803

R. v (Prisoner’s name not given), Tingewick, No details of offence Witness: Nicholas Franklin, overseer of Tingewick

Michaelmas, 1805

R. v Nicholas Franklin (tailor), Tingewick, Misdemeanour Witness: John Price, keeper of Tingewick, Workhouse

Easter session 1819:

R. v William Matthews Tingewick, Stealing 3 yards British Lace, value 10s.6d., and also a Lace Box, value 1s. property of Mary Moss. Witnesses: James Cross, Tingewick, Mary Moss, Tingewick, lace-worker. Richard Perkins, Buckingham, lace dealer at Winslow. Hennah Skelton, sister-in-law of prisoner. Thomas Dickens, constable of Tingewick. – Bradford, Guilty – 12 months’ imprisonment, hard labour, and to be publicly whipped 200 yards, once in Tingewick and once in Buckingham, on a market day.

Michaelmas 16th October 1821

R. v Susan Swift Buckingham, Sending threatening letters to Mainwaring Davies, Esq., with the purpose of extorting money from him, charging him with the crime of sodomy Witnesses: Mainwaring Davies, Esq. (Mr. Adolphus), of Addington House, nr. Buckingham (78 years old), Capt. Dayrell, William Gunn, Tingewick, Thomas Dickens, Not guilty.
R. v Susan Swift and Richard Sabine Buckingham, Conspiracy Witnesses: Richard Dayrell, Esq., Rev. Mr. Reed, “the other magistrate” – King, clerk of the magistrates Mr. Davis, Not guilty.

Appeals  …  Tingewick v Little Horwood, Pauper not named, lived with Mr. Scott of Tingewick, Order quashed.

Michaelmas Session, 1821 (a different copy / extract for the same session)

R. v Susan, otherwise Susannah, Swift, [Addington], Sending letters to Mainwaring Davies, Esq., threatening to accuse him with crime punishable by law with death, with intent to extort money. Witnesses: Mainwaring Davies, of Addington House, Richard Dayrell, Esq., magistrate. William Gunn, of Tingewick. Thomas Dickins. Not Guilty
R. v Richard Savin Susan, otherwise Susannah Swift. [Addington], Conspiring to extort from Mainwaring Davies, Esq. £600 by threatening to accuse him with the crime of sodomy. Witnesses: Evidence of Mr. Davies in last prosecution admitted. Richard Dayrell, Rev. J.T.A. Reed, magistrate [Incomplete, as page torn from book]

Tingewick v Little Horwood Witnesses: John Walton, who lived with Mr. Scott at Tingewick, pauper. Wm. Scott. Order quashed.

Easter Session, 1822

R. v Wm. Ellard, Tingewick, Assaulting Wm. Everett, Constable, in execution of his office Witnesses: Wm. Everett, constable of Tingewick, John Wells, publican of “The Crown” Guilty – to be imprisoned 2 months in Common Gaol and to enter into sureties to keep peace for 2 years especially towards Wm. Everett.

Epiphany 1823

R. v William Harris, John Grantham, Tingewick [near Paper Hill Spinney, adjoining Bennett's Close, near mill], For being armed with bludgeons and entering a wood and close with the intent of killing game at night. Witnesses: William Bateman, constable, James Verney, Joshua Lawrence, Thomas Ayres, William Spencer, keeps the Cross Keys at Buckingham, Thomas Lewis, lives at Gawcott (with the accused when the crime was committed), Mr. Stow, the surgeon of Buckingham, Mr. H – ? Both guilty – 7 years’ transportation

Misdemeanours  [no ref. or date] – 1828?

R. v Edward Hervey, Tingewick, Assault on William Kew, on 10th April. Witnesses: William Kew, keeps the Royal Oak at Tingewick, George Nelson, Butcher at Buckingham. Guilty: 6 weeks’ imprisonment.

Easter Session, 20 April 1830

R. v Harten Tompkins [aged 38], Tingewick, Stealing 2 bushels of wheat, 17/6, property of his master, Wm Treadwell [no date given] Pleaded guilty: 9 months’ hard labour.

Buckingham Advertiser, Saturday January 15, 1898

1898-01-12-clipping—- 0 —

TINGEWICK

WEDDING. — The marriage of Mr. John Tompkins, of Spring Cottage, Buckingham, with Mrs. F. Steeden, of Church View, Tingewick, was solemnised at the the Parish Church, on Wednesday, January 12th, the Rev. W.J.B. Hancock (curate) officiating.  The bride, who was attired in navy blue, with bonnet to match, was given away by Mr. Atkins, of London.  Her bridesmaids were Miss Steeden (daughter), and Miss Thompson (niece), and they wore dresses of light grey trimmed with red silk, with hats to match.  Mr. Thomas Bonner, of Buckingham, accompanied the bridegroom as best man.  The guests included Miss Richardson, Mrs. Atkins, Mrs. Bonner, and Miss Alcock.  Merry peals were rung on the bells during the day, and also at Buckingham, where the bridegroom was a ringer for over half a century.

SOIREE. — An invitation soiree was again arranged this year, on the same lines as that held last year.  Invitations were sent out by the Committee to a large number of persons in the village and neighbourhood, and about 90 responded to the invite, and put in an appearance at the Board Schools, on Friday evening, January 7th, the charge being 1/6 gents, and 1/- ladies.  The Schools had been cosily arranged by the following Committee:– Mrs Richmond, Mrs. Hadland, Mrs. Barrett, Mrs. Lever, Miss Gomme, Miss Miller, Miss Thompson, Mr. Richmond (Chairman), Mr. Barnes, Mr. Woodman, Mr. Dudley, Mr. F. Hadland, and Mr. Goss, Mr. Stanley acting as Secretary, and they were very assiduous in their efforts to make the evening an enjoyable one.  A long and varied programme had been arranged, including games, singing and dancing, and all were entered into with much spirit.  During the evening, light refreshments were handed round at intervals.  The Committee had secured the services of Mrs. Lever at the piano, which was kindly lent by Mr. Richmond, Mr. Judd with piccolo, and Mr. G. Neale with the violin.  Several of the company had volunteered to sing, among these being Mr. J. Baker, Mr. G. Neale, Miss F. Barnes, Mr. E. Pollard, and Mr. G. Pollard, and altogether an enjoyable evening was spent.  A meeting of the Committee was held on Wednesday evening last, when the accounts were presented, and showed a deficit of 1/7, which was paid out of the balance on last year’s account.  The balance now in the Treasurer’s hands being 18/4.

Tingewick – in sound and vision

Jane Munro (grand-daughter of Reginald Steeden) has just sent me links to two wonderful recordings.  The first is of Frank Ayres, talking in 1957 about badger-hunting in Tingewick Woods, and of his dog being attacked by pigs there (they probably belonged to my late father-in-law!).  Frank was apparently born in 1874: I don’t have a record of him in my database, but there is a Frank Ayres who is a probable match who was born and lived in nearby Chackmore.

Jane also sent me a  newspaper cutting (see below) from 1949 which her mother had kept: to her astonishment and delight, she tracked down the film here:

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/banking-and-the-farmer

BANKING AND THE FARMER

- a wonderful period piece with, after about 9 minutes, a brief view of Buckingham NFU, meeting in the Town Hall there, with her grandfather Reg Steeden standing up to pose a question.

Many, many thanks to Jane, and if anyone comes across any similar gems, would love to hear about them!

Bankers and the Farmer

William Gough 1723-1793: a cautionary tale

Many years ago – December 2000, if not before – I appear to have imported a Gedcom file relating to the Gough family into my database.  The relevant emails have long since vanished but ten years later another Gough descendant wrote an excellent article for ‘Origins‘, the Buckinghamshire Family History Society magazine, which still makes me blush.  In it he said:

“A relatively short time ago I discovered a Gough family tree posted on a certain popular family history website … I was disheartened to find this same attribution had become an online commonplace, apparently accepted without question.”

Yes, that “popular family history website” was mine, and once again guilt drives me to repeat what Graham proves beyond all reasonable doubt – that the William Gough who married Alice Bland nee Hatton  was baptised in Heyford Warren (now Upper Heyford) in Oxfordshire, not Upton-cum-Chalvey in Buckinghamshire.

Anglicans, Baptists and Mormons – the Johnson family

On 26th February 1837, two-month-old Sarah Fountain Johnson from Northall (Bedfordshire) was baptised at Tingewick parish church along with her parents.  Adult baptisms – although unusual – are not unheard-of: my late father-in-law’s father was born in Padbury in 1871, shortly before the family moved to Tingewick.  He was, as far as I can discover, never baptised until a week before his 60th birthday, when he travelled to the family’s original parish (Lacey Green near Princes Risborough) for the ceremony.

Sarah’s parents were Benjamin and Charlotte (nee Budd); her grandfather, William  Johnson, was baptised at Tingewick in 1775, as had been his sister Ann in 1771.  Ann had married in the parish church in 1795, (witnessed, perhaps, by another sister, Catharine) but neither William nor their father John is recorded in Tingewick in the Posse Commitatus of 1798.

An email two years ago directed me to a history of the Johnson family on the FamilySearch website.  The link at the time failed to load … or it may be that, as now, the file viewer takes so long to display that I had given up.

That history quotes “The Baptists of Northall 1802-1969” by R.F. Broadfoot:

“In one of these churches [founded by John Wesley], at Eaton Bray, in Bedfordshire, a young lay preacher, William Johnson by name, was actively engaged in his itinerant ministry among the surrounding villages.  For some time his superintendent minister and the circuit officers had been critical of the young man’s independence of outlook, and sought to confine his preaching activities to those places to which he had been allocated by the Methodist ‘plan’.  To this he could not agree and accordingly, late in the year 1802, he left the Methodists and, together with some twenty others, formed an ‘independent church’ at Northall, just over the borders of Buckinghamshire.”

In 1805 he was pastor of the new church, and in 1807, when the group adopted Believers’ Baptism, William was in the first group to be baptised.

Why, then, did his son and daughter-in-law take their new baby  30-miles back to Tingewick in late winter – and be themselves christened at the same time?

One family story says that the child was named after a maternal aunt, who promised a legacy; another suggests (wrongly) that only children who appear in Church of England registers can inherit property from their fathers.  The second reason is wrong – it is the legitimacy of the parents marriage which matters, and  even if Benjamin and Charlotte believed it to be the case, they would surely have gone to the local church where they were living.

The obvious explanation is that they had become unhappy with William’s Baptist church, but – to avoid embarrassing William by a public split – had gone to a church where his parishioners would be unlikely to learn of it.

Matters did not end there, though.

In April 1846, Benjamin was baptised into the Mormon church Whipsnade by an American missionary; three weeks later, Charlotte joined him in their new faith.  By the end of the year, Benjamin had been ordained and under his leadership the Edlesborough branch became the largest in nineteenth century Buckinghamshire.

Benjamin died in 1853, just weeks after his father.  Charlotte sold everything, intending to to move to Utah to join the church community there.  Alas, all the money was stolen by a missionary entrusted to take it to Liverpool to pay the families sea passage.  It would be another eleven years before they finally embarked and, eventually reached Salt Lake City.

The Steeden family in Tingewick

richard_steedenI have just heard from a Steeden descendant, fifth cousin (I think) to my daughter.   She was enormously excited to be able to trace the family name back to 17th century Northamptonshire, using information from the Tingewick family group sheets.

Ah, but can she?

Certainly, I am confident that ALL the Steeden folk from Tingewick are descended from one couple – James Steeden and Sara Markham who married on Christmas Day 1770.

Sara was Tingewick born and bred – baptised in October 1741, her parents were Thomas Markham (1716-1769) and Catherine Poulton (bur. 1752 at Tingewick).  The Markham line is reasonably clear, linking back four more generations to the start of parish registers and beyond in Tingewick.

James Steeden, though, was an incomer.  According to the marriage register, he was from Charleton … but the next question is, which one?  There are three obvious candidates – two in Oxfordshire and one in Northamptonshire – but my money is on the one in Northamptonshire.  It’s now combined with Newbottle (which used to be the dominant hamlet) two miles east of Kings Sutton.  When I visited the graveyard some years ago I found – not Steeden graves – but Markham ones in quantity.  My main reason for linking the family to Chartlton/Newbottle, though, was finding (pre-internet search) what appeared to be plausible entries for the family on the old fiche-based IGI.

steeden_bros_1Now of course I knew that the IGI was seriously flawed: but (for my sins) I built the hypothetical tree  in my database which in due course grew into the Tingewick website.

Do I still think the family came from Newbottle?  I’m not sure.  The old IGI entries I found have not been carried through to the modern, cleaned-up online FamilySearch IGI.  But that DOES have a plausible baptism in 1745 in Bloxham – less than ten miles to the west of Charlton/Newbottle – and still with William as the father’s name.  And I have found references in the London Gazette to the bankruptcy of a Daniel Steeden in 1845.  He was a cattle dealer … the same trade followed by the Steeden families in Tingewick.

Conclusive?   No, but a straw in the wind.

 

The Coates family in Tingewick

I recently received an enquiry about Henry Coates, baptised in Tingewick in 1864, the third son of William Coates and Ann Stuchfield, who married on the last day of 1854.
[UPDATE: a Thomas Coates was appointed one of the Parish Overseers of the Poor in March 1838 - see vestry minutes page 82]
Ann was born in Tingewick in September 1834: her father was born in Tingewick in 1797 and her grandfather was buried there in 1813.  Her father was a saddler / harness maker and so far has not appeared in the Overseers Records of 1829.  She was 20 when she married William Coates, only a couple of years older than her but already a widower.  I haven’t found his first marriage, but he appears on the 1851 census of Syresham with his wife Elizabeth (who was born in Claydon, Oxfordshire), living in his father’s household along with his two unmarried aunts and his cousin, daughter of one of them.  There is a possible death for Elizabeth in the 4th quarter of 1851.
I’m not aware of any connection between the Coates family and Tingewick: there was a Humphrey Coates, farmer, listed in the 1847 Post Office Directory for Tingewick, but he doesn’t appear on the 1851 census there (there is a death in Q2 of 1851 in Buckingham District that may be his) – perhaps William’s father (also William) inherited Humphrey’s property?
There are no Coates entries in the Tingewick section of the 1854 Post Office Directory, or Kelly’s in the same year:  the 1861 census records the whole family  in Tingewick – William and Ann with their first two sons and Ann’s father living with them; and – in another house – William senior, with his two unmarried daughters and his grand-daughter.
William and Ann baptised four sons in Tingewick: Richard James, in 1858; William John in 1861; Henry in 1864; and Nathaniel in 1868.  I also wonder if Isaac and Rebecca – presumably twins, born in January 1867 and buried barely a month later in Tingewick churchyard – were also their children.  And there was a Harriett Mary whose birth was registered in Buckingham District in the final quarter of 1856, and her death in Q1 of 1857.  Was she their first child?
Ann died in early February 1869,  followed in April 1870 by baby Nathaniel, not yet two years old.  A year later, at the 1871 census, Richard – the oldest boy, now 12 – is still living with his maiden aunts and cousin in Tingewick (his grandfather had probably died in 1867).  The two surviving younger boys – William and Henry – are in Union Workhouse in Buckingham.  I have not been able to locate their father William anywhere on the 1871 census – did he go abroad, perhaps to America, to seek his fortune?  I only have a handful of copies of the Post Office and Kelly’s directories, but each (1869, 1877 and later) continue to show William’s name, and in 1881 he is back in Tingewick, living  again with his surviving sister (one died in 1875) until her death in 1894.
Meanwhile, it may be that the young boys did not stay in the workhouse for long.  In 1873, Jackson’s Oxford Journal of February 22 reported that:
“[at] BUCKINGHAM … DIVISIONAL PETTY SESSIONS, SATURDAY … Before the Hon. P. Barrington and Chas. Higgins, Esq. …

Martin Lucas, of Tingewick, baker, was charged with assaulting Henry Coates, a lad ten years of age.  It appeared that defendant had some snow-balls thrown at him, and believing the compainant was the lad who threw them, he sent his small dog after him, which complainant alleged bit his leg.  The Bench dismissed the case.”

However the older boy William, died in 1878, when he was still only 17.
The remaining boys married: Richard was still in the parish in 1901, with his wife and six children: Henry also married a Tingewick girl but I think moved away – hopefully my enquirer will fill in some more of the details.

“From Tingewick to Tioga” – a history of James Holton (1831-1917)

James Holton was born at Tingewick  in 1831, eighth child of James and Maria.  At around the same time, his uncle Thomas emigrated to Tioga in Pennsylvania with his wife and three daughters.  Twenty years later, James joined him.

dsc01960

Some years ago, two of  his 3-great and 4-great granddaughters took a family history written by his son and collaborated on turning it into a book.    We transcribed the diary – exactly as it was written – then I checked and wrote footnotes about all the people mentioned.  Mary Holton Robare assembled a wonderful selection of family and local photographs: Jan Ezell Anderson cross-checked my notes and tracked down nearly 1,000 direct descendants.

The result was, though I say it myself, rather impressive.

dsc01962

Today I learned – thanks to Sue Dudley – that it appears in the National Library of Australia online library list.

If anyone is interested in a copy, I believe they can still be bought from Creative Continuum.