The funeral of Shugborough Newitt Steeden, 15th November 1918

[sent to me by June Underwood of the Buckinghamshire Remembers website.  Although Shugborough Newitt Steeden’s name appears on both the Tingewick parish war memorials, he is not recorded on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission site because he died of influenza, not of his wounds]

From the Buckingham Advertiser and North Bucks Free Press, Saturday November 30, 1918

The second part of the cutting reads:

“… – A particularly sad scene was wit-
nessed in the village on the 15th inst., in the
presence of the Washington car passing through
the Main Street carrying two coffins containing
the mortal remains of Shugborough Newitt
Steeden, aged 29, and Elsie Louisa, his wife, aged
30, both having passed away the same night,
leaving two little children – a girl, 6 years old,
and a boy, aged 4. Deceased was a grandson of
the late John Steeden, of Tingewick, and his
wife a daughter of Ebenezer Newman Pollard.
He joined Kitchener’s Army in the early days of
the war, was drafted into the Oxford and Bucks
L.I., and sent to France, where after a few
months he was severely wounded, his life being
despaired of for some time. Treated in Glasgow
Hospital with every care, after a year or so he
was discharged about 12 months since, the marks
most visible of his wounds being a stiff knee and
the loss of two fingers. He was a gardener in the
employ of Lady Lawrence at Chetwode Manor
previous to the war, and only a week before his
death he removed from Tingewick to The Gables,
near Winslow, to act in the same capacity with
Lady Addington, the floral wreath sent by the
latter being one of the many floral tributes to
the memory of two lives so swiftly removed from
us. Of a cheerful and obliging nature, deceased
had many friends. Symbolical of a union ex-
pressed in life, one grave contains both husband
and wife. The Rev. P.E. Rayner (Rector) offi-
ciated
—–*——

shugborough steeden

Tingewick Historical Society – re-issue of Bygone Tingewick series

In the 1970s, 80s and 90s members of the Tingewick Historical Society produced four books on Tingewick’s history.   These books are now available again for £2 per book plus postage and packing. The contents of each book are listed below. To obtain copies please contact Sara Churchfield sara.churchfield@btinternet.com or Ruth Roy ruthroy@hotmail.com

Bygone Tingewick 1977

  • How do you spell Tingewick?
  • The History of Tingewick Church
  • The Tingewick Exhibition of 1887
  • Lacemaking in Tingewick
  • Roman Remains
  • Water Stratford’s most noted Rector
  • Village Customs
  • Chetwode Rhyne-Toll
  • Tingewick in the early 1870s
  • Tingewick Mill
  • Tingewick School

Bygone Tingewick 1979

  • Tingwick – Extract from a book by Browne Willis 1755
  • One Hundred Years Ago
  • Extract from the 1877 Exhibition Handbook
  • Tingewick before the 1914/1918 War
  • Tingewick in War
  • Tombstones
  • An 18th Century Will
  • The Church Warden’s Chest of St Mary Magdalene Tingewick
  • Old Family Names
  • Tingewick Clocks
  • Roofing Materials in Tingewick

Bygone Tingewick 1985

  • The Story of Tingewick’s Horticultural Show
  • Sir John Busby’s Company 1673
  • Tingewick’s Mean Millionaire!
  • Tingewick’s First Harvest Festival
  • Paying for Henry V111’s Wars
  • The Will and Inventory of Jane Jonson
  • Early History of the Wesleyan Chapel
  • Building Inscriptions 1634-1935
  • The Early Days of Tingewick’s Guides and Brownies
  • Church View – a Pre-enclosure Farmstead
  • A Church Inventory of 1553

Bygone Tingewick 1991

  • Tingewick Inclosure 1775
  • Tingewick Scout Troop 1930-1935
  • Richard Thomas Lucas
  • From the ‘Parish news’
  • The Windows of St Mary Magdalene Tingewick
  • Judd’s the Bootmaker – 1901 bill
  • Tingewick Parish War Memorials
  • New College, Oxford Patrons
  • Tingewick Women’s Institute 1926-1954
  • Francis Edmonds An 18th Century Tingewick Parson
  • Christmas

Isaac Coote: convicts in Van Diemen’s Land

Timeline

  • 1822 (Sep 8) – baptism of Eliza Cross in Tingewick, Buckinghamshire
  • 1832 (Mar 15) – Isaac Coote sentenced to death, commuted to transportation for life, at Bury St. Edmonds, Suffolk
  • 1832 (Apr 6) – arrival in Tasmania of John and Frances Cross and ?five children aboard ‘Forth
  • 1832 (Dec 29) – arrival of Isaac Coote in Hobart aboard ‘York
  • 1838 (Feb 28) – Eliza Cross marries Isaac Coote
  • 1838 (Jun 17) – baptism of Matilda, dau of Isaac (‘tailor’) and Eliza Coote
  • 1840 (May 5?) – birth of Emily, dau of Isaac (‘taylor’) and Eliza **Coots**
  • 1841 – Isaac Coote granted Ticket of Leave
  • 1842 (Aug 16) – birth of Clara, dau of Isaac (‘tailor’) and Eliza Coote
  • 1845 (Dec 15) – Isaac Coote granted Conditional Pardon
  • 1847 (Aug 21) – birth of Alfred Richard, son of Isaac (‘tailor’) and Eliza Coote
  • 1848 – Isaac and Eliza Coote recorded on census with 2 daughters + son, with another unmarried freed convict
  • 1850 (Sep 29) – Isaac Coote becomes licensee of the Angel Inn, Charles Street, Launceston (until 1854)
  • 1851 (Nov 13) – birth of Adelaide Frances, dau of Isaac and Eliza Coote
  • 1854 (May 9) – Isaac Coote becomes licensee of the Jolly Farmer, Perth (Tasmania)
  • 1855 (Nov) – birth of Arthur Isaac, son of Isaac and **Sarah** Coote
  • 1862 (Jan) – Isaac Coote becomes licensee of the Hadspen Inn, Launceston (until 1865)
  • 1868 (Feb 26) – death of Eliza Coote – death notified by Isaac, widower
  • 1869 (Apr 14) – marriage of Isaac Coote and Adeline Laird
  • 1870 (Jun 30) – birth of Thomas James Coote, son of Isaac and Adeline Coote
  • 1873 (Dec 25) – death of Isaac Coote,  (‘tailor’) , of ‘dropsy’, aged 58

In 1832, John Cross – a mason from Tingewick – and his wife Frances née Terry arrived in Tasmania aboard the ship ‘Forth‘.  He seems to have led a most interesting life and I’m hoping one of his more knowledgeable descendants might write about him here in due course.

John and Frances’ second surviving daughter Eliza was barely fifteen and already pregnant when she married convict Isaac Coote, to whom she bore at least five children before dying of ‘paralysis’ in 1868, aged just 45.

Who, though, was Isaac Coote?  My search led me to discover the wealth of information available through the Tasmanian Archives Online website and its Tasmanian Names Index – a vast number of searchable scans, freely available.  A word of warning, though – the images are HUGE and very slow to load, so not something to attempt on a mobile phone signal!

Lent Assizes for Bury St Edmunds, 1832 (from Ancestry.com)

Lent Assizes for Bury St Edmunds, 1832 (from Ancestry.com)

Isaac was, it seems, convicted of housebreaking at Bury St. Edmonds Assizes on 15th March 1832, one of thirteen men sentenced to death for offences ranging from sheep-stealing to sacrilege.  As often happened at the time, none of the sentences were carried out: most were commuted to transportation – one for  7 years, the others (including Isaac) for ‘life’  but one man (a sheep-stealer) was merely imprisoned for 12 months!

Six months later, Isaac was one of 200 convicts aboard the ‘York‘ sailing from London and Plymouth, arriving in Hobart on 29th December 1832 after a three month voyage.

1832Coote,Isaac-description-CON18-1-21_00261_L_c

Description list from Linc Tasmania CON18/1/21

 

On arrival, his description was carefully noted: he was 5’5½”, aged 19, with fair complexion and a small head.  His hair was brown and he had ‘small’ brown whiskers.  His ‘visage’ was small and narrow, his forehead low and retreating.  His eyebrows were dark brown, his eyes dark grey, his nose small and his mouth ‘normal width’.  His chin – in proportion with the rest of his face – was ‘small’ and he had a blue mark on his left arm.

Once disembarked, he was assigned the number 1442 and assigned to work for a Mr Fletcher as a ‘house servant’.

Conduct record from Linc Tasmania CON31/1/7

 

According to his conduct record, he had a few brushes with authority – absconding, ‘neglect of work’, and helping himself to his master’s ‘porter’ and chickens.

Marriages at Launceston, 1838 from Linc Tasmania, http://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD35-1-42p34j2k

Marriages at Launceston, 1838 from Linc Tasmania, RGD36/1/3

However, in February 1838 he was granted permission to marry Eliza Cross; in June their daughter Matilda was born followed by Emily (1840), Clara (1842) and Alfred Richard (1847)  – Isaac’s occupation recorded as a ‘tailor’ on each of the birth / baptism records.

Approx. 1845, from ancestry.com HO 10/59 page 102

Approx. 1845, from ancestry.com HO 10/59 page 102

In 1841 he was given a Ticket of Leave and granted a Conditional Pardon in December 1845.  The governor’s recommendation states that his ‘conduct having been good for many years past and … having completed beyond the ordinary servitude with a Ticket of Leave

1848 census of Van Diemen’s Land from Linc Tasmania CEN1/1/98

The 1848 census return gives a full and interesting view of their household.  The house was brick-built, in parish ‘No 2’   There were three adults (aged 21-45) living there, presumably Isaac and Eliza and another unmarried male.  Both men seem to have been freed former convicts.

1848 census of Van Diemen's Land from Linc Tasmania CEN1/1/98

1848 census of Van Diemen’s Land from Linc Tasmania CEN1/1/98

 

 

 

 

 

Although Isaac and Eliza had four children by the last day of 1847, only three were recorded as living at home at the time of the census.  All are said to have married and had children: who and where was the missing child?  Matilda was by this time 10 years old, soon to be 11.  Was she, perhaps, already working in another house in the town?  No names are given in the census, so we may never know.

Rather surprisingly, both men and the baby are said to be Church of England, but Eliza and the two girls were Roman Catholics!  Isaac’s occupation falls under the heading of  ‘Mechanics and Artificers’: the other man was a ‘Domestic Servant‘.

Births at Launceston, 1851 from Linc Tasmania, RGD32/1/3  http://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD32-1-3-p673j2k

Births at Launceston, 1851 from Linc Tasmania, RGD32/1/3

The Launceston Examiner, Wed. 8 September 1852 (from trove.nla.gov.au)

The Launceston Examiner, Wed. 8 September 1852 (from trove.nla.gov.au)

 

 

In 1850, Isaac took up a new career – licensee of the Angel Inn in Charles Street Launceston – a licence he renewed three times, the third time in October 1853.  This new occupation is reflected in the baptism record of their daughter Adelaide Frances in 1851.

In May 1854, Isaac took on the licence of another hostelry – this time the Jolly Farmer in the township of Perth on the plains to the south of Launceston.

Births in Longford, from Linc, Tasmania, RGD33/1/33

Births in Longford, 1855, from Linc Tasmania, RGD33/1/33

18 months later, there is a rather odd birth recorded at Longford (close to Perth and around 7 km / 4.5 miles to the West): Arthur Isaac Coote, son of **Sarah** and Isaac Coote: father’s trade is given as “Licensed Publican” so it seems reasonable to assume this is ‘our’ Isaac.

It’s been suggested that Sarah might have been Sarah Cross – Eliza’s sister – but I’m unconvinced.  She was married to James Devall, had borne him a daughter in the previous year or so and would bear him another two years later.  My best guess is that the wife’s name has been mis-heard, mis-written – or even mis-remembered by the registrar.  The page does not seem well-maintained – several entries (including this one) are lacking the informant’s signature, and the mother’s maiden name is also omitted.

By 1862, they were back in Launceston, this time running the Hadspen Inn, renewing the licence each year until at least 1865.

1868 death record from Linc Tasmania

Deaths at Launceston, 1868 from Linc Tasmania RGD35/1/37

In 1868, Eliza Coote died of “paralysis”, aged 45, and two days before her 30th wedding anniversary.  Her occupation is given as “Publican’s wife” and Isaac registered the death.  Hardly the actions of an estranged husband who was living with another woman, since they had grown-up children who could have done what was necessary.

 

18690414-Coote,Isaac-marr-IMAGE_282_c

Marriages in Launceston, 1869, from Linc Tasmania RGD37/1/28

 

Fourteen months later, Isaac married again – this time to the 24 year old Adeline Laird.  The marriage took place in his house in Youngtown.

 

Launceston birth record from Linc Tasmania RGD33/1/48 no 59

Births at Launceston, 1870 from Linc Tasmania RGD33/1/48

Their son Thomas James was born the following year, 1870: Isaac was still recorded as a ‘Licensed Victualler’.

 

from Linc Tasmania RGD35/1/42 no 2239 Deaths at Launceston, 1873

Deaths at Launceston, 1873 from Linc Tasmania RGD35/1/42

Isaac died at Launceston on Christmas Day 1873 of ‘Dropsy’, aged 58 – having apparently reverted to his original occupation of ‘tailor’.


What, though, of Isaac’s origins?  My money is on Isaac Coot, born (according to Ancestry) 29th November 1814, at Sudbury in Suffolk, son of Isaac Coot and Matilda.  There are other births recorded for the couple: Robert (15 Oct 1812), Richard (8 Mar 1817) and Eliza (17 May 1819) but I’ve not found their marriage.


On 29 Jan 1761, at All Saints, Sudbury, an (earlier) Isaac Coot  married Sarah Pain.

On 10 Oct 1734, at All Saints, Sudbury, an (earlier) Isaac Coot  married Elizabeth Sneell.

Tingewick Historical Society – Great War Project – update

To commemorate the centenary of the start of The Great War members of Tingewick Historical Society have been researching Tingewick’s WW1 soldiers who are named on our village war memorials. We have now published a book telling the stories of the twenty two soldiers and copies can be obtained from Ruth Roy ruthroy@hotmail.com  or Lorraine Carter lorraine.carter@btinternet.com  price £3 50 plus £1 postage in the UK (please contact Ruth or Lorraine for p&p cost if overseas).

Over one hundred and forty Tingewick men fought in The Great War and we will be researching their stories over the next few years.  We would be pleased to hear from any descendants of those men – if you have any information or photographs please contact Ruth or Lorraine.

OCTOGENARIAN’S FOURTH WIFE (1925)

Octogenarian's Fourth Wife (1925)

NEWS IN BRIEF. (1925, July 28). The Cessnock Eagle and South Maitland Recorder (NSW : 1913 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved November 5, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99363824

Spotted by Sue D in Australia:

“NEWS IN BRIEF

OCTOGENARIAN’S FOURTH WIFE

Mr. Joseph Burrows aged 82, and Mrs. Jemima Cooper, aged 66, both of Tingewick (Bucks), were married at the register office, Buckingham. This is Mr. Burrows’ fourth marriage. He is of independent means.”

Cessnock Eagle and South Maitland Recorder, Tuesday 28 July 1925, p 5. —-  a newspaper from rural Cessnock and Maitland, New South Wales, Australia [near Newcastle, NSW) (coal mining and agricultural areas”

================================================

Joseph Burrows was the son of John Burrows of Buckingham and Hannah Smith who had married at Tingewick in April 1839 – he was the second of their five children, four of whom were boys.  Until his first marriage (probably just after the 1871 census), he lived with his parents and siblings in Buckingham; ten years later he was a general labourer in Tower Hamlets, London, with his first wife and two children.  In 1891 he was a widower, still in Tower Hamlets but soon afterwards he married again and by 1901 he had another son under ten years old.  That wife retired with him to Tingewick before the 1911 census (where he describes himself as a “retired dock labourer”; presumably she died, he married, and was widowed a third time before his marriage to Mrs Cooper in 1925.

Jemima and her first husband – Abel Cooper – were both born in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire.  The first of their five children was born in Cornwall, the next back in Chipping Norton, the third in London.  Around 1896, they moved to Tingewick, where Abel worked as a labourer before becoming a beer retailer in Cross Lane from around 1907 to 1915.

Joseph Burrows died in the third quarter of 1830.

The loss of the Northfleet, 1873

Fetch-2473I wrote most of this piece six months ago but got side-tracked (as usual!) before I’d finished tying up loose ends.  Then, quite by chance, two things happened within a week: I had an email from a descendant of Caroline Holton; and I came across a newspaper cutting (The Bucks Herald of 1st March 1873), reporting on the inquest into another of the people who drowned.

 

[The account of the wreck comes from the Maritime Moments website, to whom I am greatly indebted.]

Some years ago I contributed notes and annotations to a book entitled “From Tingewick to Tioga“.  It was based on an account of the Holton family, written in 1917 by Joseph T. Holton whose father had emigrated from Tingewick to Pennsylvania in 1851.  One of his notes said:

“My aunt, Caroline Holton was born 1826 and she married John _________ and they had children born unto them and they was drownded in the North Sea in 1873 and one child was safe in a boat and was adopted by people near Dover, but they say it died.  But they say that they left two girls and they married two brothers named Day and that they went to London, but they have not heard.”

Caroline had, in fact, married John Taplin in October 1848 at Tingewick.  He was probably working on the railway line, which was built across the northern edge of the parish around 1847. They had six daughters in the next twelve years.  The second was baptised in Tingewick but died in infancy: the two youngest were twins, born in 1862.

The family was constantly on the move: Welling in Hertfordshire in 1849; Whatlington in Sussex in 1851; Dudley, Worcestershire in 1854; Tiveydale in Staffordshire in 1859; Bakewell in Derbyshire in 1861; Rosebury in Derbyshire in 1862; and  Finsbury in London in 1871.  By 1873, perhaps the boom in railway work in England had ended.  John signed up to work on the Tasmanian Railroad, and – with his wife and three youngest daughters – boarded the Northfleet in London.  On board were 379 people (including the crew and the pilot), 340 tons of iron rails, and 240 tons of other equipment, bound for Hobart in Tasmania.  At 11 am on January 13 1873, she slipped down the river from London.

The late January weather was stormy and more than a week later they had only reached Dungeness, where they spent the night of the 22nd at anchor, in company with perhaps 300 other boats waiting for the weather to lift.  Sometime after midnight, disaster struck – a steamer ran into them, striking them hard on the starboard side.  Without identifying herself, the steamer backed away and vanished into the night.

For whatever reason, only two of the seven lifeboats were launched.  Perhaps there wasn’t time (from the inquest I just found, ‘the lashings were too tight’) – within 30 minutes, the boat had sunk.  In spite of the captain’s best efforts (including, apparently, shooting a man in the knee who disobeyed his orders), only two women, one child and one baby were saved.  The rest of the 86 survivors were all men, including 11 of the crew.  So much for women and children first!  In all, 293 lives were lost: 41 were women; 43 were children; and 7 were babies under 1 year old.

The one child that was saved was Maria Taplin.  It seems they were soon picked up by a steam tug, the City of London, and taken to the Seaman’s Mission in Dover.  The captain’s wife – now widowed – offered to take Maria to London: the newspapers printed her story, and offers to adopt her poured in.  Some versions say she went to live with her older sisters, now married: but the death registered in Dover in the third quarter of 1879 of a 17-year old Maria Taplin is probably hers.

“NEXT OF KIN WANTED and others to their advantage” – 1910

Advertising. (1910, November 15). Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 – 1947), p. 4. Retrieved September 30, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148951166

screen-capture

Bradbury, Henrietta, who lived atTingewick, Bucks, about 30 years ago,  wanted to her advantage. L.L. 4639

 

Henrietta’s father, Richard Bradbury, was a grocer in Islington on the 1881 census: he was the son of Thomas Bradbury, for ten years or so around 1838-1849 the landlord of the White Hart public house in Tingewick.  Richard and his six siblings were all baptised in Tingewick but Henrietta was born in Islington, and I’m not aware that she ever lived in Tingewick.

UNDER AN EXPRESS, July 1907

UNDER AN EXPRESS. (1907, July 20). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved September 6, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article88139638

 

screen-capture-16UNDER AN EXPRESS.
Willie Shepherd is evidently not fated to
be killed on the railway, for after falling
out of a train and being knocked down by
an express he is running about as though
such things were among the commonplaces
of everyday life (says ‘Lloyd’s News’).
Willie, who is only 5 years old, was tra-
velling with his father, William Shepherd,
to Tingewick, near Buckingham. The boy
was looking out of tbe window of the car-
riage shortly after the train left Twyford,
when the door flew open and he fell out.
The communication cord was pulled, and
the train brought to a standstill. The father
at once got out, and saw his son walking
between tbe metals on which an express
was approaching at a high speed. The
boy was dashed to the ground by the ex-
press before his father could reach him, but
when the express passed he rose to his feet
and ran towards his father with his head
and face covered with blood. He was con-
veyed by train to Maidenhead, and after
being medically treated was taken on to
Buckingham, where he was further at-
tended to. Except for abrasions on the
face and nose the little chap is apparently
none the worse for his adventure. ‘I re-
member falling out of the train,’ he says.
‘It did not hurt me. I was not frightened,
because I am a brave boy. When I saw
the train going away from me I got up and
ran for the train. It did not stop,
though.’


screen-capture-17
A doctor declares that so long as a cyclist,
after a long ride, has a good appetite, does
not feel a desire to go to sleep at once,
and is not annoyed by heavy dreams when
he goes to bed, he may consider that he
has not made too great a demand on his
physical resources.

ENGLISH LADY’S LETTER, August 1949

ENGLISH LADY’S LETTER. (1949, August 26). The Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal (NSW : 1888 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved September 6, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119269216
screen-capture-14

ENGLISH LADY’S LETTER
CONDEMNS ENGLAND’S
SOCIALIST GOVERNMENT
Writing to a friend in Braidwood,
Lady Eva Keyes, of ‘Tingewick House,”
Buckingham, England, who visited
this district nearly five years ago
sends thanks for a parcel sent her
recently by a local lady. She also ex-
pressed her opinion in pretty plain
terms of conditions in England under
what she terms the ‘spendthrift, so-
cialist and incompetent Labour Gov-
ernment.’ The letter reads: —
‘How awfully kind of you to send
me a parcel. I appreciate your kind
remembrance and thought for me
very much, and send you warmest
thanks. The parcel will be most use-
ful, as of course you know our meat
ration is very small nowadays, worse
than during the war even, so a few
extra tins are a great help for when-
ever someone extra turns up unex-
pectedly especially.
‘People in Australia have been won-
derfully kind in sending parcels to
people here, and it has made a great
difference in helping the dull rations
out. Ten years of austerity and ra-
tions is too long, but I don’t suppose
it will get any better until we can get
this spendthrift Socialist and incom-
petent Government out and get back
to freedom and private enterprise
again, instead of being tied up in im-
possible rules and regulations with
thousands of unnecessary Government
officials to run them and waste our
money. They have lost millions over
the potatoes alone this year, as I know
from my own experience here. I am
market gardening, and was asked by
the Agricultural Committee to grow
an acre of potatoes. I had a very
good crop of over 10 tons, but was not
allowed to sell them to the local fish
and chip shop, who wanted them in
February: instead, the Government
bought them, but left them in the
slumps until end of June, by which
time they were nearly all bad, and,
having paid me £92, they only got £8
for the remainder as pig food, and
my lovely potatoes and all the work we
had growing them was wasted. This
happened all over the country, as they
had bought thousands of tons from
abroad, which were not wanted at all.
‘This is typical of their bulk buying,
instead of leaving it to the people who
understand it and the ordinary mar-
ket supply and demand. I have done
fairly well with garden produce and
poultry, and the hard work keeps me
occupied at any rate.
‘I look back to our wonderful trip
to Australia and the many kind peo-
ple we met there and often wish I
was back there again, but don’t sup-
pose I shall ever do anything half as
interesting again.’

British Army Records 1914-1920

Some Tingewick men who appear in the British Army records 1914-1920

[last update: 1st Sept 2014]

Albert John Aris, ‘Canteen Steward’, born 1880, son of John and Maria (Greaves): Royal Garrison Artillery: signed up 13 Oct 1914: discharged (having been promoted several times, finally to rank of Sgt) 26 June 1919.  He must have been an impressive sight – relatively tall at 5 ft 10½ and weighing 182 lbs when he enlisted, he had a 42 in chest and a number of tattoos – “flags on inside of left arm, & figure of General Butler on forearm & faith home & charity, also figures on right arm, Lord Kitchener &c”.  He appears to have joined the army for 6 years in 1898, which he extended for a further 6 years in August 1905 while serving as a gunner in Gibraltar.  He also served in Sierra Leone, South Africa and Malta, finally discharged from the regular army in 1913, after nearly 16 years’ service, during which he had been promoted to Bombardier but had reverted to Gunner at his own request!

Thomas George Barnes, labourer, born 1880, son of  Joseph and Mary Ann: enlisted 10 Nov 1914 but two weeks later: “Discharged – not being likely to become an efficient soldier under para 392(111)(c) Kings Regulations” – signed by the colonel commanding the 8th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry.  He appeared before a medical board but there is no record of any physical disability.

William Ambrose Cross Neale, shoemaker, born 1879, son of Elizabeth Neale enlisted 30th June 1915 in the Army Services Corps. His army record shows his ‘physical development’ was ‘poor’ and he wore glasses.  He sailed to France aboard SS ‘Lydia‘ in July 1915 and joined 16 Labour Coy at Rouen: he was absent from roll call in November and lost 3 days’ pay.  He was invalided to England (T.S. ‘Panama‘) on 12 March 1916 and admitted to Manchester Western Hospital suffering from ‘Debility‘ caused by diarrhoea and vomiting, and with sleep problems.  Six weeks later he was discharged from hospital with his weight regained and sleep improved but on 21st June 1916 he received a “Discharge being no longer physically fit for work” and was awarded a pension of 4/8d per week.  His medical notes also show that he had a slight heart murmur.

George Alfred Richardson, clerk, born 1890, son of James and Louisa was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.  His citation reads:

“265046 CSM G.A. Richardson MM 1/1st Bn. TF (Tingewick) (ITALY)
“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion
to duty during the attack north of
Asiago on 1st November 1918, when in
face of heavy machine-gun, rifle and
shell fire he did magnificent work in
reorganising the men on the various
objectives and leading them forward.
By his cheerfulness and coolness he set
a very fine example to all about him.
(25.2.20)”

Reginald George Benjamin Steeden, farmer, born 1884, son of James and Jane (nee Paxton) enlisted at Bletchley Recruiting Office on 14 December 1915 and was appointed to the 96th Territorial Reserve Battalion – perhaps because of his occupation.  However, he appears to have seen at least one spell in the British Expeditionary Force at the end of September 1917.

James Arthur Stuchfield, railway porter born 1891, son of George and Elizabeth (Lucas) joined the Grenadier Guards 31st August 1908 and was discharged into the Reserves after three years service.  He was mobilised as part of the Expeditionary Forces on 5th August 1914 – the day after war was declared.  He was wounded in the leg in September 1916 and returned to the UK where he remained until he was again transferred to the reserves in June 1918.

Abel Townsend, platelayer with the L & N W railway, was a relative newcomer to the village.  He was born in Mixbury but his family had moved to Finmere before the 1891 census, and he had presumably set up home in Tingewick when he married.  His daughter Beatrice had been baptised at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in October 1906.  He was attested in December 1915 but was medically classified “B1” and kept ‘on reserve’ until March 1917, when he was finally posted to Egypt with the Railway Company, Royal Engineers, as a platelayer / sapper.  He was transferred out in April 1919 with “Lumbago & Sciatica, following Dysentery (attributed)” – 40% disablement and awarded a pension – initially – of 11/- per week.  He appears to have contracted Amoebic Dysentery in Palestine in October 1918, when he was admitted to hospital with diarrhoea and vomiting.

The items in his possession on admission to hospital in Cairo were inventoried as: 1 pair drawers, 1 pair gaiters, 1 pair putties, 2 flannel shire, 3 pairs socks, 1 towel, 1 pair trousers, a fork, a holdall, a clasp knife and a table knife and a spoon, a haversack, boots with laces, braces, shaving and tooth brush, cap with badge, hair comb, tropical helmet, and razor in a case.  His medical notes are also quite comprehensive – perhaps a little too graphic, considering his ailment, but fascinating as a window into that aspect of life in the Great War.  They even include his temperature chart!

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ALSO:

William Ball, born 1881, enlisted in the Northamptonshire Regiment in 1903 and served in South Africa.  In 1906 he married Martha Jane Stuchbury at Hillesden: she lived in Tingewick, and her daughters (Celia May and Ethel) were born there in 1903 and 1908.  William served in France in 1914 and 1915: he was severely wounded / gassed on 25th September 1915 and was discharged 30 March 1916.