Tingewick Male Fashion in 1754

Spotted by Sue in Australia in the Oxford Journal in February 1754

“Whereas Edward Jakeman and Thomas Day, both of
the Parish of Tingewick in the County of Bucks,
on the fifteenth Day of December last past, made their
Escape from the Constable and others, as they were con-
ducting them to Aylesbury Gaol for a Burglary.  Who-
ever shall apprehend the said Jakeman and Day, and send
Notice thereof to Mr. John Peake of Tingewick aforesaid,
shall receive Ten Guineas and reasonable Charges or five
Guineas for either of them by me

JOHN PEAKE.

Jakeman is a lusty Man, dark brown curled Hair, has a
large hooked Nose, fresh Colour, about forty Years of
Age; had on when he escaped, a coarse Sacking Frock,
a white Flannel Waistcoat, and Sacking Breeches.  Day is
a sprightly Man, of a fair Complexion, about five Feet
eight Inches high, light-coloured Hair, has but the Sight
of one Eye, the other having a large Speck over it, about
thirty Years of Age; had on when he escaped, a brown
Drab-coloured Coat, and Boots, but has been since seen
near Buckingham in a Light Grey Frock, Scarlet Waist-
coat, and Boots.”

Alas, I can’t add much more to the tale: Edward Jakeman would have been born around 1715.  Was he the brother of Hemmins Jakeman, son of John (born 1721 in Stratton Audley) who came to Tingewick in March 1740 as an apprentice cordwainer (a type of shoemaker), marrying local girl Elizabeth Reeves nearly three years later  and baptising two sons in Tingewick?  According to a family tree on Ancestry, Hemmings John Jakeman did have a brother Edward, born 1715, who married Bridget Hearn in Stratton Audley in 1745 and died in Preston Bissett in 1782 … so it seems he wasn’t one of the unfortunates who was transported to the colonies for his crimes.

There was also a Mary Day of Tingewick who married Mordecai Burnham at Stowe in 1751: a sister perhaps of the absconding felon?

John Peake, on the other hand, was a man of property and substance: at his marriage to Anne Perkins in 1745 at Finmere, he is given the honorary title of “Mister” and she of “Mistress”: and he was allocated several portions of land in the Tingewick Inclosure of 1774.  Presumably it was his house which had been burgled by Jakeman and Day?

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Tingewick World War I project

To commemorate the centenary of the start of WW1 members of Tingewick Historical Society  are researching Tingewick’s WW1 soldiers who are named on our village war memorials.   We would love to hear from people descended from those families who have photographs or stories to share with us.  Over one hundred Tingewick men fought in World War One and, while we are currently researching those that died, we would also be pleased to hear from descendants of any of the men who survived.  If you have any information please contact Ruth Roy ruthroy@hotmail.com  or Lorraine Carter   lorraine.carter@btinternet.com (and, perhaps, add details here as a comment)

Crime and punishment – 1803-1830

From the Buckinghamshire Quarter Sessions, extracted from the National Archives website:

Michaelmas, 1803

R. v (Prisoner’s name not given), Tingewick, No details of offence Witness: Nicholas Franklin, overseer of Tingewick

Michaelmas, 1805

R. v Nicholas Franklin (tailor), Tingewick, Misdemeanour Witness: John Price, keeper of Tingewick, Workhouse

Easter session 1819:

R. v William Matthews Tingewick, Stealing 3 yards British Lace, value 10s.6d., and also a Lace Box, value 1s. property of Mary Moss. Witnesses: James Cross, Tingewick, Mary Moss, Tingewick, lace-worker. Richard Perkins, Buckingham, lace dealer at Winslow. Hennah Skelton, sister-in-law of prisoner. Thomas Dickens, constable of Tingewick. – Bradford, Guilty – 12 months’ imprisonment, hard labour, and to be publicly whipped 200 yards, once in Tingewick and once in Buckingham, on a market day.

Michaelmas 16th October 1821

R. v Susan Swift Buckingham, Sending threatening letters to Mainwaring Davies, Esq., with the purpose of extorting money from him, charging him with the crime of sodomy Witnesses: Mainwaring Davies, Esq. (Mr. Adolphus), of Addington House, nr. Buckingham (78 years old), Capt. Dayrell, William Gunn, Tingewick, Thomas Dickens, Not guilty.
R. v Susan Swift and Richard Sabine Buckingham, Conspiracy Witnesses: Richard Dayrell, Esq., Rev. Mr. Reed, “the other magistrate” – King, clerk of the magistrates Mr. Davis, Not guilty.

Appeals  …  Tingewick v Little Horwood, Pauper not named, lived with Mr. Scott of Tingewick, Order quashed.

Michaelmas Session, 1821 (a different copy / extract for the same session)

R. v Susan, otherwise Susannah, Swift, [Addington], Sending letters to Mainwaring Davies, Esq., threatening to accuse him with crime punishable by law with death, with intent to extort money. Witnesses: Mainwaring Davies, of Addington House, Richard Dayrell, Esq., magistrate. William Gunn, of Tingewick. Thomas Dickins. Not Guilty
R. v Richard Savin Susan, otherwise Susannah Swift. [Addington], Conspiring to extort from Mainwaring Davies, Esq. £600 by threatening to accuse him with the crime of sodomy. Witnesses: Evidence of Mr. Davies in last prosecution admitted. Richard Dayrell, Rev. J.T.A. Reed, magistrate [Incomplete, as page torn from book]

Tingewick v Little Horwood Witnesses: John Walton, who lived with Mr. Scott at Tingewick, pauper. Wm. Scott. Order quashed.

Easter Session, 1822

R. v Wm. Ellard, Tingewick, Assaulting Wm. Everett, Constable, in execution of his office Witnesses: Wm. Everett, constable of Tingewick, John Wells, publican of “The Crown” Guilty – to be imprisoned 2 months in Common Gaol and to enter into sureties to keep peace for 2 years especially towards Wm. Everett.

Epiphany 1823

R. v William Harris, John Grantham, Tingewick [near Paper Hill Spinney, adjoining Bennett’s Close, near mill], For being armed with bludgeons and entering a wood and close with the intent of killing game at night. Witnesses: William Bateman, constable, James Verney, Joshua Lawrence, Thomas Ayres, William Spencer, keeps the Cross Keys at Buckingham, Thomas Lewis, lives at Gawcott (with the accused when the crime was committed), Mr. Stow, the surgeon of Buckingham, Mr. H – ? Both guilty – 7 years’ transportation

Misdemeanours  [no ref. or date] – 1828?

R. v Edward Hervey, Tingewick, Assault on William Kew, on 10th April. Witnesses: William Kew, keeps the Royal Oak at Tingewick, George Nelson, Butcher at Buckingham. Guilty: 6 weeks’ imprisonment.

Easter Session, 20 April 1830

R. v Harten Tompkins [aged 38], Tingewick, Stealing 2 bushels of wheat, 17/6, property of his master, Wm Treadwell [no date given] Pleaded guilty: 9 months’ hard labour.