Jackson’s Oxford Journal November 1847

BUCKINGHAM, Nov. 4
Jackson’s Oxford Journal (Oxford, England), Saturday, November 6, 1847; Issue 4932

BUCKINGHAM PETTY SESSIONS, October 30.
(Before Revds. A. Baynes and W.T. Eyre)

SELLING BEER WITHOUT A LICENCE. — James Moody, alias, James Townsend, alias Wiltshire Jemmy, late of Tingewick, was charged by Mr. Thomas Jones, Excise Officer, with having sold beer at Tingewick without a licence. The accused did not appear, and it was stated that he had absconded. The charge was that he had sold beer at a building by the side of the Buckinghamshire Railway works. Mr. A. Cornwall, Supervisor of Excise, appeared on the part of the Crown. It appeared that the summons had been left at Jemmy’s late habitation but nine clear days, whereas ten clear days were required by law. The Magistrates in consequence declined going on with the case. Mr. Cornwall forthwith applied for, and obtained, a fresh summons.

POOR RATES. — William Steeden, wheelwright, summoned by Mr. A. Durrant, one of the overseers of Tingewick, for arrears of poor’s rates, amounting to 7s. 10½. Thomas Hayward, working brewer, was also summoned for 5s. 3d. The parties pleaded inability, and stated their circumstances to the Magistrates, who said they had not the power of excusing them, and that as the rates were pressed they must order payment; but they considered that the parish ought not to enforce the rates, and they advised the defendants to apply at the next vestry to be excused from payment. — Mr. Thomas Painter said that the men were tenants of his; they had been picked out, while others living in better cottages, and who were more able to pay, were excused, and that persons who had 100l. in the bank were not made to pay. — Mr Durrant said the men were able to pay, and that Mr. Painter, the guardian of the parish, ought not to tell persons not to pay their rates. — The defendants were ordered to pay the rates, and 2s. each costs.

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A layman forger at Edgcott!

 

screen-capture-11

A loose end in the Tingewick database led me to this burial in Edgcott, Northamptonshire of William Sewell aged 78.  It took place on 6th October 1856 but it was the barely-decipherable note below in the officiating minister’s name that caught my eye.  It reads:

F. W. Stewart
off. Minister
who afterwards
turnd out to be a Layman
was convicted of Forgery
and transported’

Well I never!

Isaac Coote: convicts in Van Diemen’s Land

Timeline

  • 1822 (Sep 8) – baptism of Eliza Cross in Tingewick, Buckinghamshire
  • 1832 (Mar 15) – Isaac Coote sentenced to death, commuted to transportation for life, at Bury St. Edmonds, Suffolk
  • 1832 (Apr 6) – arrival in Tasmania of John and Frances Cross and ?five children aboard ‘Forth
  • 1832 (Dec 29) – arrival of Isaac Coote in Hobart aboard ‘York
  • 1838 (Feb 28) – Eliza Cross marries Isaac Coote
  • 1838 (Jun 17) – baptism of Matilda, dau of Isaac (‘tailor’) and Eliza Coote
  • 1840 (May 5?) – birth of Emily, dau of Isaac (‘taylor’) and Eliza **Coots**
  • 1841 – Isaac Coote granted Ticket of Leave
  • 1842 (Aug 16) – birth of Clara, dau of Isaac (‘tailor’) and Eliza Coote
  • 1845 (Dec 15) – Isaac Coote granted Conditional Pardon
  • 1847 (Aug 21) – birth of Alfred Richard, son of Isaac (‘tailor’) and Eliza Coote
  • 1848 – Isaac and Eliza Coote recorded on census with 2 daughters + son, with another unmarried freed convict
  • 1850 (Sep 29) – Isaac Coote becomes licensee of the Angel Inn, Charles Street, Launceston (until 1854)
  • 1851 (Nov 13) – birth of Adelaide Frances, dau of Isaac and Eliza Coote
  • 1854 (May 9) – Isaac Coote becomes licensee of the Jolly Farmer, Perth (Tasmania)
  • 1855 (Nov) – birth of Arthur Isaac, son of Isaac and **Sarah** Coote
  • 1862 (Jan) – Isaac Coote becomes licensee of the Hadspen Inn, Launceston (until 1865)
  • 1868 (Feb 26) – death of Eliza Coote – death notified by Isaac, widower
  • 1869 (Apr 14) – marriage of Isaac Coote and Adeline Laird
  • 1870 (Jun 30) – birth of Thomas James Coote, son of Isaac and Adeline Coote
  • 1873 (Dec 25) – death of Isaac Coote,  (‘tailor’) , of ‘dropsy’, aged 58

In 1832, John Cross – a mason from Tingewick – and his wife Frances née Terry arrived in Tasmania aboard the ship ‘Forth‘.  He seems to have led a most interesting life and I’m hoping one of his more knowledgeable descendants might write about him here in due course.

John and Frances’ second surviving daughter Eliza was barely fifteen and already pregnant when she married convict Isaac Coote, to whom she bore at least five children before dying of ‘paralysis’ in 1868, aged just 45.

Who, though, was Isaac Coote?  My search led me to discover the wealth of information available through the Tasmanian Archives Online website and its Tasmanian Names Index – a vast number of searchable scans, freely available.  A word of warning, though – the images are HUGE and very slow to load, so not something to attempt on a mobile phone signal!

Lent Assizes for Bury St Edmunds, 1832 (from Ancestry.com)

Lent Assizes for Bury St Edmunds, 1832 (from Ancestry.com)

Isaac was, it seems, convicted of housebreaking at Bury St. Edmonds Assizes on 15th March 1832, one of thirteen men sentenced to death for offences ranging from sheep-stealing to sacrilege.  As often happened at the time, none of the sentences were carried out: most were commuted to transportation – one for  7 years, the others (including Isaac) for ‘life’  but one man (a sheep-stealer) was merely imprisoned for 12 months!

Six months later, Isaac was one of 200 convicts aboard the ‘York‘ sailing from London and Plymouth, arriving in Hobart on 29th December 1832 after a three month voyage.

1832Coote,Isaac-description-CON18-1-21_00261_L_c

Description list from Linc Tasmania CON18/1/21

 

On arrival, his description was carefully noted: he was 5’5½”, aged 19, with fair complexion and a small head.  His hair was brown and he had ‘small’ brown whiskers.  His ‘visage’ was small and narrow, his forehead low and retreating.  His eyebrows were dark brown, his eyes dark grey, his nose small and his mouth ‘normal width’.  His chin – in proportion with the rest of his face – was ‘small’ and he had a blue mark on his left arm.

Once disembarked, he was assigned the number 1442 and assigned to work for a Mr Fletcher as a ‘house servant’.

Conduct record from Linc Tasmania CON31/1/7

 

According to his conduct record, he had a few brushes with authority – absconding, ‘neglect of work’, and helping himself to his master’s ‘porter’ and chickens.

Marriages at Launceston, 1838 from Linc Tasmania, http://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD35-1-42p34j2k

Marriages at Launceston, 1838 from Linc Tasmania, RGD36/1/3

However, in February 1838 he was granted permission to marry Eliza Cross; in June their daughter Matilda was born followed by Emily (1840), Clara (1842) and Alfred Richard (1847)  – Isaac’s occupation recorded as a ‘tailor’ on each of the birth / baptism records.

Approx. 1845, from ancestry.com HO 10/59 page 102

Approx. 1845, from ancestry.com HO 10/59 page 102

In 1841 he was given a Ticket of Leave and granted a Conditional Pardon in December 1845.  The governor’s recommendation states that his ‘conduct having been good for many years past and … having completed beyond the ordinary servitude with a Ticket of Leave

1848 census of Van Diemen’s Land from Linc Tasmania CEN1/1/98

The 1848 census return gives a full and interesting view of their household.  The house was brick-built, in parish ‘No 2’   There were three adults (aged 21-45) living there, presumably Isaac and Eliza and another unmarried male.  Both men seem to have been freed former convicts.

1848 census of Van Diemen's Land from Linc Tasmania CEN1/1/98

1848 census of Van Diemen’s Land from Linc Tasmania CEN1/1/98

 

 

 

 

 

Although Isaac and Eliza had four children by the last day of 1847, only three were recorded as living at home at the time of the census.  All are said to have married and had children: who and where was the missing child?  Matilda was by this time 10 years old, soon to be 11.  Was she, perhaps, already working in another house in the town?  No names are given in the census, so we may never know.

Rather surprisingly, both men and the baby are said to be Church of England, but Eliza and the two girls were Roman Catholics!  Isaac’s occupation falls under the heading of  ‘Mechanics and Artificers’: the other man was a ‘Domestic Servant‘.

Births at Launceston, 1851 from Linc Tasmania, RGD32/1/3  http://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD32-1-3-p673j2k

Births at Launceston, 1851 from Linc Tasmania, RGD32/1/3

The Launceston Examiner, Wed. 8 September 1852 (from trove.nla.gov.au)

The Launceston Examiner, Wed. 8 September 1852 (from trove.nla.gov.au)

 

 

In 1850, Isaac took up a new career – licensee of the Angel Inn in Charles Street Launceston – a licence he renewed three times, the third time in October 1853.  This new occupation is reflected in the baptism record of their daughter Adelaide Frances in 1851.

In May 1854, Isaac took on the licence of another hostelry – this time the Jolly Farmer in the township of Perth on the plains to the south of Launceston.

Births in Longford, from Linc, Tasmania, RGD33/1/33

Births in Longford, 1855, from Linc Tasmania, RGD33/1/33

18 months later, there is a rather odd birth recorded at Longford (close to Perth and around 7 km / 4.5 miles to the West): Arthur Isaac Coote, son of **Sarah** and Isaac Coote: father’s trade is given as “Licensed Publican” so it seems reasonable to assume this is ‘our’ Isaac.

It’s been suggested that Sarah might have been Sarah Cross – Eliza’s sister – but I’m unconvinced.  She was married to James Devall, had borne him a daughter in the previous year or so and would bear him another two years later.  My best guess is that the wife’s name has been mis-heard, mis-written – or even mis-remembered by the registrar.  The page does not seem well-maintained – several entries (including this one) are lacking the informant’s signature, and the mother’s maiden name is also omitted.

By 1862, they were back in Launceston, this time running the Hadspen Inn, renewing the licence each year until at least 1865.

1868 death record from Linc Tasmania

Deaths at Launceston, 1868 from Linc Tasmania RGD35/1/37

In 1868, Eliza Coote died of “paralysis”, aged 45, and two days before her 30th wedding anniversary.  Her occupation is given as “Publican’s wife” and Isaac registered the death.  Hardly the actions of an estranged husband who was living with another woman, since they had grown-up children who could have done what was necessary.

 

18690414-Coote,Isaac-marr-IMAGE_282_c

Marriages in Launceston, 1869, from Linc Tasmania RGD37/1/28

 

Fourteen months later, Isaac married again – this time to the 24 year old Adeline Laird.  The marriage took place in his house in Youngtown.

 

Launceston birth record from Linc Tasmania RGD33/1/48 no 59

Births at Launceston, 1870 from Linc Tasmania RGD33/1/48

Their son Thomas James was born the following year, 1870: Isaac was still recorded as a ‘Licensed Victualler’.

 

from Linc Tasmania RGD35/1/42 no 2239 Deaths at Launceston, 1873

Deaths at Launceston, 1873 from Linc Tasmania RGD35/1/42

Isaac died at Launceston on Christmas Day 1873 of ‘Dropsy’, aged 58 – having apparently reverted to his original occupation of ‘tailor’.


What, though, of Isaac’s origins?  My money is on Isaac Coot, born (according to Ancestry) 29th November 1814, at Sudbury in Suffolk, son of Isaac Coot and Matilda.  There are other births recorded for the couple: Robert (15 Oct 1812), Richard (8 Mar 1817) and Eliza (17 May 1819) but I’ve not found their marriage.


On 29 Jan 1761, at All Saints, Sudbury, an (earlier) Isaac Coot  married Sarah Pain.

On 10 Oct 1734, at All Saints, Sudbury, an (earlier) Isaac Coot  married Elizabeth Sneell.

Tingewick Male Fashion in 1754

Spotted by Sue in Australia in the Oxford Journal in February 1754

“Whereas Edward Jakeman and Thomas Day, both of
the Parish of Tingewick in the County of Bucks,
on the fifteenth Day of December last past, made their
Escape from the Constable and others, as they were con-
ducting them to Aylesbury Gaol for a Burglary.  Who-
ever shall apprehend the said Jakeman and Day, and send
Notice thereof to Mr. John Peake of Tingewick aforesaid,
shall receive Ten Guineas and reasonable Charges or five
Guineas for either of them by me

JOHN PEAKE.

Jakeman is a lusty Man, dark brown curled Hair, has a
large hooked Nose, fresh Colour, about forty Years of
Age; had on when he escaped, a coarse Sacking Frock,
a white Flannel Waistcoat, and Sacking Breeches.  Day is
a sprightly Man, of a fair Complexion, about five Feet
eight Inches high, light-coloured Hair, has but the Sight
of one Eye, the other having a large Speck over it, about
thirty Years of Age; had on when he escaped, a brown
Drab-coloured Coat, and Boots, but has been since seen
near Buckingham in a Light Grey Frock, Scarlet Waist-
coat, and Boots.”

Alas, I can’t add much more to the tale: Edward Jakeman would have been born around 1715.  Was he the brother of Hemmins Jakeman, son of John (born 1721 in Stratton Audley) who came to Tingewick in March 1740 as an apprentice cordwainer (a type of shoemaker), marrying local girl Elizabeth Reeves nearly three years later  and baptising two sons in Tingewick?  According to a family tree on Ancestry, Hemmings John Jakeman did have a brother Edward, born 1715, who married Bridget Hearn in Stratton Audley in 1745 and died in Preston Bissett in 1782 … so it seems he wasn’t one of the unfortunates who was transported to the colonies for his crimes.

There was also a Mary Day of Tingewick who married Mordecai Burnham at Stowe in 1751: a sister perhaps of the absconding felon?

John Peake, on the other hand, was a man of property and substance: at his marriage to Anne Perkins in 1745 at Finmere, he is given the honorary title of “Mister” and she of “Mistress”: and he was allocated several portions of land in the Tingewick Inclosure of 1774.  Presumably it was his house which had been burgled by Jakeman and Day?

Crime and punishment – 1803-1830

From the Buckinghamshire Quarter Sessions, extracted from the National Archives website:

Michaelmas, 1803

R. v (Prisoner’s name not given), Tingewick, No details of offence Witness: Nicholas Franklin, overseer of Tingewick

Michaelmas, 1805

R. v Nicholas Franklin (tailor), Tingewick, Misdemeanour Witness: John Price, keeper of Tingewick, Workhouse

Easter session 1819:

R. v William Matthews Tingewick, Stealing 3 yards British Lace, value 10s.6d., and also a Lace Box, value 1s. property of Mary Moss. Witnesses: James Cross, Tingewick, Mary Moss, Tingewick, lace-worker. Richard Perkins, Buckingham, lace dealer at Winslow. Hennah Skelton, sister-in-law of prisoner. Thomas Dickens, constable of Tingewick. – Bradford, Guilty – 12 months’ imprisonment, hard labour, and to be publicly whipped 200 yards, once in Tingewick and once in Buckingham, on a market day.

Michaelmas 16th October 1821

R. v Susan Swift Buckingham, Sending threatening letters to Mainwaring Davies, Esq., with the purpose of extorting money from him, charging him with the crime of sodomy Witnesses: Mainwaring Davies, Esq. (Mr. Adolphus), of Addington House, nr. Buckingham (78 years old), Capt. Dayrell, William Gunn, Tingewick, Thomas Dickens, Not guilty.
R. v Susan Swift and Richard Sabine Buckingham, Conspiracy Witnesses: Richard Dayrell, Esq., Rev. Mr. Reed, “the other magistrate” – King, clerk of the magistrates Mr. Davis, Not guilty.

Appeals  …  Tingewick v Little Horwood, Pauper not named, lived with Mr. Scott of Tingewick, Order quashed.

Michaelmas Session, 1821 (a different copy / extract for the same session)

R. v Susan, otherwise Susannah, Swift, [Addington], Sending letters to Mainwaring Davies, Esq., threatening to accuse him with crime punishable by law with death, with intent to extort money. Witnesses: Mainwaring Davies, of Addington House, Richard Dayrell, Esq., magistrate. William Gunn, of Tingewick. Thomas Dickins. Not Guilty
R. v Richard Savin Susan, otherwise Susannah Swift. [Addington], Conspiring to extort from Mainwaring Davies, Esq. £600 by threatening to accuse him with the crime of sodomy. Witnesses: Evidence of Mr. Davies in last prosecution admitted. Richard Dayrell, Rev. J.T.A. Reed, magistrate [Incomplete, as page torn from book]

Tingewick v Little Horwood Witnesses: John Walton, who lived with Mr. Scott at Tingewick, pauper. Wm. Scott. Order quashed.

Easter Session, 1822

R. v Wm. Ellard, Tingewick, Assaulting Wm. Everett, Constable, in execution of his office Witnesses: Wm. Everett, constable of Tingewick, John Wells, publican of “The Crown” Guilty – to be imprisoned 2 months in Common Gaol and to enter into sureties to keep peace for 2 years especially towards Wm. Everett.

Epiphany 1823

R. v William Harris, John Grantham, Tingewick [near Paper Hill Spinney, adjoining Bennett’s Close, near mill], For being armed with bludgeons and entering a wood and close with the intent of killing game at night. Witnesses: William Bateman, constable, James Verney, Joshua Lawrence, Thomas Ayres, William Spencer, keeps the Cross Keys at Buckingham, Thomas Lewis, lives at Gawcott (with the accused when the crime was committed), Mr. Stow, the surgeon of Buckingham, Mr. H – ? Both guilty – 7 years’ transportation

Misdemeanours  [no ref. or date] – 1828?

R. v Edward Hervey, Tingewick, Assault on William Kew, on 10th April. Witnesses: William Kew, keeps the Royal Oak at Tingewick, George Nelson, Butcher at Buckingham. Guilty: 6 weeks’ imprisonment.

Easter Session, 20 April 1830

R. v Harten Tompkins [aged 38], Tingewick, Stealing 2 bushels of wheat, 17/6, property of his master, Wm Treadwell [no date given] Pleaded guilty: 9 months’ hard labour.