Linford-Holton family photo-sleuthing

elizabethholtonfamily

Angela Manders has sent me some photos of her Moss / Holton family, including this group.  She says lady in the centre is Elizabeth Linford née Holton, (1839-1917).  The youngest lady seated at the far left of the photo is her youngest daughter Elizabeth (1884-1964) whose husband William Ridgway is standing behind her.  Another daughter, Caroline (born in 1876), is seated at the far right of the photo.  She married Joseph Moss in 1901 in Peckham where they continued to live – again, he is standing behind his wife.

Angela wonders if anyone can help identify the other people in the photo and help her to date it. Elizabeth had given birth to ten children, of whom seven were lived to adulthood:

  • Joseph ?Inns (1857-58) – died age 1
  • William George (1862-79) – died age 17
  • Eliza Ann (1867-1871) – died age 4
  • Emily Maria (1870-1942) m. Alfred Jesse Bennett – age 39 in 1909, living with husband & 5 children in Buckingham
  • James Thomas (1872-1934) m. Ada Tasker  – age 37 in 1909, living in Rugby, Warwickshire with wife and children – the youngest of whom was only born in the first quarter of 1909, so perhaps unlikely to be in Tingewick in April 1909
  • Joseph (1874-1937) m. Minnie Lucy Collier Steeden (no children) – age 35 in 1909, perhaps living separately from wife who – by 1911 – was in Nottinghamshire
  • Daniel (1875-1918) m. Clara Ethel Smith – age 34 in 1909, living in Leicestershire with his wife and 3 children: the youngest was 1 year old in 1909
  • Caroline (1876-1960) m. Joseph Moss – age 32 in 1909,  living in London with her husband and 8-year-old son
  • Esther (1878-1956) m. James Linford – age 31 in 1909, living with her husband and three children in Maids Moreton [in spite of the same surname I’ve not found a family connection between them … yet!]
  • Elizabeth (1884-1964) m. William Ridgeway – age 25 when she married in April 1909, still living with her mother in Tingewick in 1911

We know that daughter Elizabeth jnr. (identified by Angela as sitting at the far left of the picture) married William Ridgway five days after Elizabeth snr’s birthday, on 19th April 1909, so – since William is standing behind Elizabeth in the same way that Caroline’s husband stands behind her – I think this photo is unlikely to have been taken more than a year or two before that.  Elizabeth jnr. would have been 25 in 1909: again, her appearance agrees more or less with that date.   I then wondered if it might be a gathering of the family to celebrate Elizabeth’s 70th birthday on 14th April 1909, with a second celebration (of Elizabeth jnr’s marriage) to come a few days later.

Three of Elizabeth’s surviving daughters still lived in the Buckingham area (Caroline – sitting at the right of the photo – was living in London).  The lady in the white blouse beside Caroline looks a bit older and might be Emily, aged 39: but where is Esther (aged 31)?  Perhaps she is the smiling lady behind the man (presumably her husband, James Linford) seated with the child.  The man in the centre, standing behind Elizabeth, could be Elizabeth’s middle son Joseph, aged 35, whose marriage to Minnie Steeden might already have failed – by 1911 she was living in Nottingham; later she worked in Canada and only returned to England a few weeks before she died at the end of 1934.

The couple at the far left of the photo might be youngest son Daniel (age 34) and his wife Clara who would have travelled here from Leicestershire.  It’s perhaps less likely that it would be Elizabeth’s oldest son James, since his wife – Ada née Tasker – had given birth in the first part of 1909 so they would probably have been unable to come all the way from Rugby.  But that leaves me unable to guess who the final lady at the far right of the picture might be.  Perhaps, then, James and his wife did make the journey and she, not surprisingly, has been given a chair with James standing beside her.  The last unidentified lady might then be Emily, unaccompanied by her husband

Does anyone have any photos of any of the people mentioned to help prove or disprove my theory?

OCTOGENARIAN’S FOURTH WIFE (1925)

Octogenarian's Fourth Wife (1925)

NEWS IN BRIEF. (1925, July 28). The Cessnock Eagle and South Maitland Recorder (NSW : 1913 – 1954), p. 5. Retrieved November 5, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99363824

Spotted by Sue D in Australia:

“NEWS IN BRIEF

OCTOGENARIAN’S FOURTH WIFE

Mr. Joseph Burrows aged 82, and Mrs. Jemima Cooper, aged 66, both of Tingewick (Bucks), were married at the register office, Buckingham. This is Mr. Burrows’ fourth marriage. He is of independent means.”

Cessnock Eagle and South Maitland Recorder, Tuesday 28 July 1925, p 5. —-  a newspaper from rural Cessnock and Maitland, New South Wales, Australia [near Newcastle, NSW) (coal mining and agricultural areas”

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Joseph Burrows was the son of John Burrows of Buckingham and Hannah Smith who had married at Tingewick in April 1839 – he was the second of their five children, four of whom were boys.  Until his first marriage (probably just after the 1871 census), he lived with his parents and siblings in Buckingham; ten years later he was a general labourer in Tower Hamlets, London, with his first wife and two children.  In 1891 he was a widower, still in Tower Hamlets but soon afterwards he married again and by 1901 he had another son under ten years old.  That wife retired with him to Tingewick before the 1911 census (where he describes himself as a “retired dock labourer”; presumably she died, he married, and was widowed a third time before his marriage to Mrs Cooper in 1925.

Jemima and her first husband – Abel Cooper – were both born in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire.  The first of their five children was born in Cornwall, the next back in Chipping Norton, the third in London.  Around 1896, they moved to Tingewick, where Abel worked as a labourer before becoming a beer retailer in Cross Lane from around 1907 to 1915.

Joseph Burrows died in the third quarter of 1830.

Buckingham Advertiser, Saturday January 15, 1898

1898-01-12-clipping—- 0 —

TINGEWICK

WEDDING. — The marriage of Mr. John Tompkins, of Spring Cottage, Buckingham, with Mrs. F. Steeden, of Church View, Tingewick, was solemnised at the the Parish Church, on Wednesday, January 12th, the Rev. W.J.B. Hancock (curate) officiating.  The bride, who was attired in navy blue, with bonnet to match, was given away by Mr. Atkins, of London.  Her bridesmaids were Miss Steeden (daughter), and Miss Thompson (niece), and they wore dresses of light grey trimmed with red silk, with hats to match.  Mr. Thomas Bonner, of Buckingham, accompanied the bridegroom as best man.  The guests included Miss Richardson, Mrs. Atkins, Mrs. Bonner, and Miss Alcock.  Merry peals were rung on the bells during the day, and also at Buckingham, where the bridegroom was a ringer for over half a century.

SOIREE. — An invitation soiree was again arranged this year, on the same lines as that held last year.  Invitations were sent out by the Committee to a large number of persons in the village and neighbourhood, and about 90 responded to the invite, and put in an appearance at the Board Schools, on Friday evening, January 7th, the charge being 1/6 gents, and 1/- ladies.  The Schools had been cosily arranged by the following Committee:– Mrs Richmond, Mrs. Hadland, Mrs. Barrett, Mrs. Lever, Miss Gomme, Miss Miller, Miss Thompson, Mr. Richmond (Chairman), Mr. Barnes, Mr. Woodman, Mr. Dudley, Mr. F. Hadland, and Mr. Goss, Mr. Stanley acting as Secretary, and they were very assiduous in their efforts to make the evening an enjoyable one.  A long and varied programme had been arranged, including games, singing and dancing, and all were entered into with much spirit.  During the evening, light refreshments were handed round at intervals.  The Committee had secured the services of Mrs. Lever at the piano, which was kindly lent by Mr. Richmond, Mr. Judd with piccolo, and Mr. G. Neale with the violin.  Several of the company had volunteered to sing, among these being Mr. J. Baker, Mr. G. Neale, Miss F. Barnes, Mr. E. Pollard, and Mr. G. Pollard, and altogether an enjoyable evening was spent.  A meeting of the Committee was held on Wednesday evening last, when the accounts were presented, and showed a deficit of 1/7, which was paid out of the balance on last year’s account.  The balance now in the Treasurer’s hands being 18/4.